Last Updated: September 24, 2017

SLVLL's All Star Selection Process 2014

In the spirt of Transparency, SLVLL presents...

SLVLL All Star Teams

Selection Process

 If you read this entire document you should get a t shirt or something.  Enjoy:)

The SLVLL All Star teams recognize children who have developed, through individual effort and coaching, the ability to play baseball at a highly skilled level and maintain great sportsmanship.  The selection to an All Star team is an honor for a child, requiring the selection process to be treated seriously by SLVLL board members, managers, coaches, and players.  Participation on an All Star team is a privilege and not a right for Managers, Coaches, and players.  These individuals will be representing SLVLL, with an opportunity to represent all of District 39 and the San Lorenzo Valley.  They must do so with a high level of sportsmanship and integrity.

 

It is the intention of SLV Little League to create a fair selection process that also yields the best teams possible to represent the league and District 39.  As such, SLVLL will select one All Star team per All-Star division whenever possible.  A lack of qualified/eligible players at a given age level could force the league to create less than 5 tournament teams.   

 

SLVLL fields teams at the 11/12, 10/11, 9/10, 8/9, and 7/8 year-old divisions.  Players whose age fits into those teams are eligible for those teams.  For example, a 9 year-old can be selected for either the 8/9 or the 9/10 team.  No parent input, permission, or release is necessary. The SLVLL board of directors does have final approval of rosters and may intervene when the best interests of the league and its post-season philosophy are not being met.

 

  

Player Eligibility

Players are “eligible” players if they satisfy all Little League Int’l rules regarding all star player eligibility AND can fulfill the attendance requirements for All Star team practices and games.

 

The Competitive Philosophy:  

The SLVLL All Star teams allow the more skilled SLVLL baseball players an opportunity to develop improved skills and gain experiences that will prepare them for future competitive baseball at higher levels.  Winning is important, as it allows the teams and players to play more games and have a more enjoyable experience.  It is not, however, a win-at-all-cost environment.  Building skills, teamwork, and self-esteem are also important.  The goal of our All Star program is to field 5 competitive teams.  However, priority in competitiveness is withheld for the 11/12 year old team, whose older players are in their last year of Little League, and whose team, if successful, can advance the furthest among the age groups (possibly all the way to the Little League World Series in Williamsport!).  

 

 

 

How Are the Teams Formed?

A meeting is scheduled near the end of May for selecting the All Star teams. All teams are selected in the same meeting, starting with the 11/12 year-old team.  Attending the meeting:  Division managers, All Star team managers, player agent, league president, and any others the league president deems appropriate.

The managers of the divisions in which the players generally played use a system of nominations and voting described below to make the rosters.  The manager of the All Star team may, if he/she desires, make the final choice of one player for his/her team’s roster.

The 11/12’s:  Players vote for the first 6 players on the team; the Majors division managers (after 6 roster spots are filled using player voting) nominate and draft the remainder of the team.

The 10/11s:  The Majors division managers select from nominated players. 

The 9/10s:  The Minors division managers select from nominated players

The 8/9’s:  The Minors division managers select from nominated players

The 7/8s:  The AA Managers select from nominated players

 

Rules, Intentions and Policies Regarding “Playing Up” in Age

This is a rare occurrence.  It is the intention of SLVLL that the 11/12 All Star team be comprised primarily of 12-year-old players.  A player on the younger age of a division can be considered for the older age team (example a 9 year-old player may be considered for the 9/10 year-old team).  No parent permission or consultation is necessary.  

 

More on “Playing up”:

Traditionally, players considered in this way have been players considered to be in the top six players of the higher division team.  A younger player is not usually chosen just because “he/she deserves to be on the team.” A younger player named to a team has traditionally expected to be a starting player who plays a valuable position, and who will generally not be substituted for.

Consequences to the younger player’s age-group All Star roster (yet to be chosen) are considered.  Rosters must be filled starting with the 11/12’s and then working down to the younger aged teams. A player who declines to play for the team he/she has been selected to will be removed from the roster and replaced.  He/she may NOT be added to another age team.

 

On “Nominations”:  

During the second half of the regular season, and by the end of the season, managers in each division (AA, Minors, and Majors) should be creating a list of players from their team who they believe should be considered for All Star play.  The manager should also solicit the parents to find out in advance if any players will be out of town or otherwise ineligible or unavailable to play.  The best practice for managers is to collect this information on ALL players on his/her team, and then make his/her list of nominations. The manager may nominate every player on his/her team; there are no limits.  However, the manager uses his/her discretion in making this list, and can consider qualities of attitude, attendance, statistics, position, etc. At the selection meeting, managers are also allowed to nominate players from other teams  not nominated by other managers. At the selection meeting, managers may also nominate players from lower divisions for consideration.  For example, the majors managers selecting the 10-11 year-old team may nominate 10 year-olds who had played the season in minors.

 

·THE PROCESS

 

The 11/12 team:

 

1.   Player Voting: near the end of the season, before the selection meeting of managers, every player in Majors division regardless of age will vote on SIX players, whose age is 12, to be part of the 11/12 team.  The ballots will have the names of every eligible 12-year-old.  The player agent will count the votes and determine the 6 who received the most votes and who will automatically be placed on the team.  The names are revealed to the player-selection group at their All Star selection meeting, which occurs late in May or early in June.  

 

2.  Nominated Players: At the selection meeting, the managers of teams in the majors division bring a list of players from their team, ages 11 or 12, whom they feel should be nominated or considered for the 11/12 year old team.  After being shown the 6 players automatically placed by the player vote, the managers post their nominations on a whiteboard or butcher paper.  Any of the managers may add a player not nominated by another manager at this time.

 

3. Roster Size is determined by the All Star team manager, which can happen before the selection votes or near the end.  Usually it is determined before the voting process.  The roster size decision should be based on the pool of players and considering the rules associated with roster size.  Taking a traditional 12 players or less means (in 2013) that every player must play 6 defensive innings and bat once; increase to 13 players and each player must bat once with no defensive innings required. Minimum roster size is 11; maximum is 14.  If the All Star manager intends to choose one player, then the selection committee will select the number of players equal to the roster size minus one.

·         

4. Manager’s Choice:  the All Star manager of the division is reserved one choice (the last choice) of player for the roster.  Traditionally this player is the 12th or 13th player.  The manager may also refuse this choice and let the committee’s votes determine the entire roster.  The manager’s choice would be made after the voting procedure reached a roster size that is one less than the desired total. For the 11/12 division, this player may be age 11 or 12.

 

5.  Discussion:  Using the roster size determined by the manager, the division managers discuss the whole group of players.  Often the topics are about performance, attitude, position needs of the team, and 11-year-olds deserving to be on the team.  Managers “make their case” for particular players, share statistics, etc.

 

6.  Voting:  Voting is conducted in rounds.  The first round starts with the total roster spots expected.  Each manager fills out the remaining spots on the roster (because 6 have already been chosen).  If the manager anticipates a 12-player roster (and wishes to choose the twelfth), then the division managers will start with a ballot numbered 1-5.  In the first round, the division managers put the names of the 5 players they believe to be the most deserving to be placed on the team. The ballots are counted by the player agent and result revealed.  Unanimously chosen players are placed on the roster.  If the group agrees on all the players then the manager makes his choice and the team is finished. The all-starmanager may also allow the selection committee to complete the roster.

 

7.  Further discussion and voting:  before each successive round of voting, the division managers (which MAY include the all-star manager) discuss the remaining players and the needs of the team based on who has made the team so far.  Again, managers fill in names on their ballot with the number that matches the number of open spots on the roster.  The all-star manager can be consulted as to positions needed or in which area the team has the most needs, plans for pitchers, etc.

 

8.  Finishing Selections: Throughout most of the process, only unanimously-chosen players will be placed on the team.  In later rounds, with only 1 or 2 spots to fill, there might be disagreement, sharing of statistics, question of players’ eligibility or vacation plans.  At some point (typically around round 4) when a vote comes back with no unanimous players voted and rosters spots still open, the player agent will call for any player with unanimous minus 1 (4 Teams, 3 votes) gets the player on the Team and so on to unanimous minus 2, until all spots have been filled. If players tied with 1 spot remaining, managers would talk again with input from the All Star manager and would vote again.If there is a stalemate, every attempt among the division managers will be made to get agreement.  Solutions to a stalemate can include any of the following:  a manager recusing him/herself from the voting; the player agent conducting a coin flip; asking the All Star manager about using his/her player choice at that time; blind draw; discussion and decision about extending the roster size.

·          

9.  Completion: When the 11/12’s roster is complete, the player agent and managers involved in the voting agree to keep the results protected until they are legally (by Little League International) allowed to release them.  On the date the results can be revealed, SLVLL will announce them through the website and subsequent phone calls by the team’s manager.

 

 

 

 

 

The 10/11’s, 9/10’s, 8/9’s, & 7/8’s

 in 2014 THE 7/8’S TEAM WILL BE SELECTED ON THE SAME DATE AS THE OTHER TEAMS

 

  1. Nominations At the selection meeting, the managers of teams in the appropriate divisions bring a list of players from their team, whom they feel should be nominated or considered for All Star play.  The managers post their nominations on a whiteboard or butcher paper.  Any of the managers may add a player not nominated by another manager at this time. Managers may also nominate players in the age pool but who played in a lower division during the season.

 

2. Roster Size is determined by the all star team manager, which can happen before the selection votes or near the end.  Usually it is determined before the voting process.  The roster size decision should be based on the pool of players and considering the rules associated with roster size.  Taking a traditional 12 players or less means that every player must play 2 defensive innings and bat once; increase to 13 players and each player must bat once with no defensive innings required. Tournaments for players aged 9/10 and above use a nine-player line up.  7/8’s and 8/9’s use a continuous batting order.  Minimum roster size is 11; maximum is 14.

 

  1. Manager’s Choice:  the all-star manager of the division is reserved one choice (the last choice) of player for the roster.  Traditionally this player is the 12th or 13th player.  The manager may also refuse this choice and let the committee’s votes determine the entire roster.  The manager’s choice would be made after the voting procedure reached a roster size that is one-less than the desired total. 

 

4.  Discussion:  Using the roster size determined by the manager, the division managers discuss the whole group of players.  Often the topics are about performance, attitude, position needs of the team, and younger-age players deserving to be on the team.  Managers “make their case” for particular players, share statistics, etc.

 

5.  Voting:  Voting is conducted in rounds.  The first round starts with the total roster spots expected.  Each manager fills out a the remaining spots on the roster .  Example: If the manager anticipates a 12-player roster (and wishes to choose the twelfth), then the division managers will start with a ballot numbered 1-11.  In the first round the division managers put the names of the eleven players they believe to be the most deserving to be placed on the team. The ballots are counted by the player agent and results of votes for all players is revealed.  Unanimously chosen players are placed on the All Star roster.  If the group agrees on all the players, then the manager makes his choice and the team is finished.

 

6.  Further discussion and voting:  before each successive round of voting, the division managers (which MAY include the All Star manager) discuss the remaining players and the needs of the team based on who has made the team so far.  Again, managers fill in names on their ballot with the number that matches the number of open spots on the roster.  The All Star manager can be consulted as to positions needed or in which area the team has the most needs, plans for pitchers, etc.

 

7.  Completing the Roster: Only unanimously-chosen players will be placed on the team at first.  In later rounds, with only 1 or 2 spots to fill, there might be disagreement, sharing of statistics, question of players’ eligibility or vacation plans.  At some point (typically around round 4) when a vote comes back with no unanimous players voted and rosters spots still open, the player agent will call for any player with votes equaling unanimous minus 1 (4 Teams, 3 votes) to be placed on the team, and so on to unanimous minus 2, until all spots have been filled. If players tied with 1 spot remaining, managers would talk again with input from All Star manager and would vote again. If there is a stalemate, every attempt among the division managers will be made to get agreement.  Solutions to a stalemate can include any of the following:  a manager recusing him/herself from the voting; the player agent conducting a coin flip; asking All Star manager about using his/her player choice at that time; blind draw; discussion and decision about extending the roster size.

 

8.  Completion: When the roster is complete, the player agent and managers involved in the voting agree to keep the results protected until they are legally (by Little League International) allowed to release them.  On the date the results can be revealed, SLVLL will announce them through the website and subsequent phone calls by the team’s manager.

 

Expectations of All Star team members:

Within the SLVLL All Star Philosophy, the following are appropriate:

·      to expect a child to arrive at practice on time and with a supportive attitude toward the team

·      to expect managers and coaches to be positive and encouraging with the players and expect them to respect the players and coaches as well

·      to expect managers and coaches to organize practices that improve player skills and build team unity and team confidence

·      to expect players to be put in a position on the field and place in a batting order where the manager feels the team will have the best chance to succeed

·      to expect the manager and coach to communicate his/her game strategy to players in a manner that will allow them to support team goals

·      to expect players to be at all practices and games

·      to expect parents of players to be supportive of SLVLL all star teams, opposing players, and the managers and coaches

 

Replacing Roster Spots on All Star Teams

 

Once the rosters have been made public, there might be a need to replace a rostered player:  an unforeseen vacation, an injury, or other family need.  If a parent or player refuses to play for the team, they will not be offered to switch teams, and their only choice will be to take themselves out of tournament play consideration.  Replacing a player will be done using rules from the Little League rule book.

 

Traditionally, SLVLL has handled replacing rostered All Stars this way:

 

The player agent will provide the All Star team manager a list of eligible players from the original list of nominated players. Traditionally, the manager chooses a player from the original nominated player list from the age group, who was NOT selected by another age group team.  An example:  the 11/12 year old team loses a player to injury.  The manager goes back to the list of eligible 12s and 11’s not selected on to other teamswith the player agent and selects/contacts a player.  

 

The player agent, along with the  SLVLL board, may have to get involved if there is more than one roster spot on a team to be filled.