Welcome to the home of the

Post 98 Merrimack Legion Baseball

Welcome


YOU DON'T GET BETTER BY NOT PLAYING


Welcome to the home of the Merrimack Post 98 Legion Baseball program. We will try to keep this site updated with the best possible information. If you want more information or would like us to post something that is not being addressed, do not hesitate to give me a call or drop me an email at henzleym@gmail.com

The 2015 schedules for Junior & Senior teams are complete.  Please call if you have any questions.  603-341-2330


 

Here are 13 possible causes of poor control that you may not have considered:

  1. Does the pitcher have good posture and balance? (The pitcher should keep his chin over his belt with an erect trunk.)
  2. Is the pitcher tall and fully loaded over his back leg before moving toward landing, or is his back leg collapsing?
  3. Is the pitcher moving toward landing leading with his front hip but getting his pelvis moving using his back hip? Or is he trying to move using his legs, which will create problems?
  4. At what point does the pitcher start to move toward landing? Too early or too late? Does the back leg collapse?
  5. Does the pitcher’s lower body move toward landing prior to hand break?
  6. Does the pitcher rotate his hips too early? Does his back leg collapse where his back knee starts to turn down toward mound? (He should be using a lunge-type move off the back leg.)
  7. Does the pitcher’s nose stay over his bellybutton all the way until landing? (Draw an imaginary line upon landing from the ground to the sky – the nose should be on or behind that line. This will indicate whether he is rushing his motion or not where he is not leading with his lower body.)
  8. Does the pitcher land on the midline with his front foot slightly angled, or is he landing more toward first or third base? (Both ways he will lose power and add stress to his arm.)
  9. Does he land on a flexed leg and does the leg not begin to straighten until just prior to ball release? (Big control problems occur when the front leg is beginning to straighten as the pelvis and trunk are rotating. This will indicate whether his stride is long enough or not. Should be somewhere between 85-90%.)
  10. Upon landing, is the pitcher’s back leg nearly fully extended (straight) or is the back leg flexed too much? (If it’s flexed, he is losing velocity and trying to get power from his arm instead of his lower body.)
  11. Is the pitcher directing his body sideways so his trunk (front shoulder) is pointing directly at the target upon landing? Is his trunk erect with his head over his belt or is he leaning back with his head over his butt?
  12. Does the pitcher’s throwing arm elbow reach shoulder height just as his front foot is getting ready to turn and land or is his arm getting up too early or never reaching shoulder height? (This will indicate proper timing between his arm throwing arm and his lower body.)
  13. Is the pitcher rotating his trunk before flexing his trunk forward?

What are your odds of playing college sports?

RECRUITING BLOG: WHAT ARE YOUR ODDS OF PLAYING COLLEGE SPORTS?

By Gary Silvers Suburban One Sports

Want to play college sports?

If so, your odds of fulfilling that dream are only slightly better than the odds of a Philadelphia professional sports team winning a championship this year.

Yes, that bad.

I don’t mean to burst your collegiate bubble, but let’s face facts: Only 6 percent of high school athletes will play in college. That’s right, only six out of 100.

How did I arrive at that lowly figure? Simple math (although no math is simple for me).

There are approximately 7.5 million high school athletes (freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors) in the U.S. Of those, there are about 1.875 million seniors (7.5 million divided by four).

 At last count, there were about 450,000 NCAA student-athletes (Division I, II and III), including about 112,500 freshmen (450,000 divided by four).

Therefore, about 1.875 million high school seniors are competing for about 112,500 freshman roster spots. If you divide 112,500 into 1.875 million, you get 6 percent.

Unfortunately, it’s the end of the road for the other 94 percent of high school athletes … unless they plan to play club or intramural sports in college.

Boys’ sports with the highest percentage of high school athletes competing in college are: 1. Fencing (29.7); 2. Gymnastics (18.6); 3. Lacrosse (13.0); 4. Ice hockey (12.2); 5. Baseball (11.5).

Girls’ sports with the highest percentage of high school athletes competing in college are: 1. Fencing (38.2); 2. Ice hockey (23.0); 3. Lacrosse (13.3); 4. Soccer (10.1); 5. Water polo (9.5).

Boys’ sports with the lowest percentage of high school athletes competing in college are: 1. Bowling (2.6); 2. Wrestling (3.6); 3. (tie) Track & field (4.2) and Volleyball (4.2); 5. Tennis (5.3).

Girls’ sports with the lowest percentage of high school athletes competing in college are: 1. Bowling (4.4); 2. Track & field (4.8); 3. Tennis (5.0); 4. Volleyball (6.1); 5. Basketball (6.4).

(Disclaimer: That’s not including sports such as archery, badminton, beach volleyball, cycling, equestrian, rifle, rodeo, sailing, skiing, snowboarding, squash and synchronized swimming. Bet you didn’t know colleges even offer some of those sports.)

To make matters worse, if your heart is set on playing at the highest level in college, you likely will end up with a broken heart.

Only 1.8 percent of high school boys will compete in Division I; 1.3 percent in Division II; and 2.1 percent in Division III. An additional 0.8 percent will play at NAIA schools and 0.8 percent at junior colleges.

Only 2.2 percent of high school girls will compete in Division I; 1.2 percent in Division II; and 2.2 percent in Division III. Another 0.8 percent will play at NAIA schools and 0.7 percent at junior colleges.

What do those numbers mean?

Very few high school athletes will play in college, especially at the highest level.

Can you be one of them?

Absolutely, but the odds are against you.

How can you beat the odds?

Stay tuned…

 

Gary Silvers, Area Director of College Scouting for National Scouting Report, writes a weekly recruiting blog for SuburbanOneSports.com. He can be reached at (215) 480-8764 or gsilvers@nsr-inc.com.


D-I coaches push Legion over travel ball in forum


Upcoming Games/Practices

Tuesday, Jun 14
Manchester Post #79 @ Jr - Merrimack Post #985:30pmMerrimack High School
Friday, Jun 17
Dover Post #8 @ Sr - Merrimack Post #985:15pmDaniel Webster College
Monday, Jun 20
Rochester Post #7 @ Sr - Merrimack Post #985:15pmDaniel Webster College
Tuesday, Jun 21
Jr - Merrimack Post #98 @ Windham Post 1095:30pmGriffin Park
Wednesday, Jun 22
Sr - Merrimack Post #98 @ Derry Post #95:15pmPinkerton JV
Jr - Merrimack Post #98 @ Hudson Post 485:30pmAlvirne HS
Thursday, Jun 23
Exeter Post #32 @ Sr - Merrimack Post #985:30pmDaniel Webster College
Saturday, Jun 25
Jr - Merrimack Post #98 @ Exeter Post 3211:00amExeter High School
Sr - Merrimack Post #98 @ Exeter Post #322:00pmExeter High School
Sunday, Jun 26
Sr - Merrimack Post #98 @ Londonderry Post #275:00pmLondonderry HS
Tuesday, Jun 28
Derry Post #9 @ Sr - Merrimack Post #985:15pmDaniel Webster College
Windham Post 109 @ Jr - Merrimack Post #985:30pmMerrimack High School
Wednesday, Jun 29
Nashua Post #124 @ Sr - Merrimack Post #985:15pmDaniel Webster College

For a complete schedule listing, click here!