BOYS  GAME RULES

 

7th/8th Grade Boys Rules Game Objective: The objective of the game is to move the ball using the crosse (stick) to score a goal. Kicking the ball is permitted. The ball may be kicked into the goal.

Field: Fields will be 110 x 60 where possible but no less than 100yds in length by 55 yds wide. Markings will include sidelines, backlines, goal creases, center line with midfield wing restraining lines and attack and defense restraining lines parallel with the center line and 20yds from the center line.

Teams will occupy one side of the field and parents/fans will occupy the other. No parents are allowed on the team side. Positions: Each team will start with 10 players on the field: three attack, three mid-fielders, three defenders, and one goalie. Game Duration, Time Outs: Games will comprised of two 25 minute halves.

Halftime will be 5 minutes long. Referees will request the home coach to assign someone to manage the game clock and the penalty clock. Each team is allowed two time outs per half (one minute in duration). The clock will be stopped during time outs.

Referees: There will be two referees officiating a game. All referees will be certified referees. Contact: Body checking is allowed with certain limitations. The use of body checks is permitted for the sole purpose to dislodge a ball from the opposing player. No take out checks are permitted by any player. Takeout checks are defined as any check in which the player lowers his head or should (or with enough force) to put another player on the ground.

Defense Long Sticks: A maximum of four poles may be used. Scoring: Official scoring will not be kept; however when one team achieves a four point score differential, the scored-upon team will begin play at the midfield line in a free clear situation until the goal differential is reduced to under 4 goals.

Required Equipment: All players must wear a helmet (helmet must be NOCSAE certified), gloves, shoulder pads, arm pads, protective cup, and a colored mouth guard. Players may not participate in the game without being properly equipped with all the required protective equipment. Should a piece of protective equipment become dislodged during the course of play, play will be stopped so the player can recover the missing equipment. Players may not participate in play without a stick. Stick length is 40 to 42 inches for short sticks; 52 to 72 inches for poles and 40 to 72 inches for goalie sticks. Playing with improper equipment may result in a one to three minute, non-releasable, personal foul.

Face Offs: Face-offs occur at the start of each quarter (or halves) and after each goal scored. Two mid-fielders will take positions at the center of the field for the face-off. The other mid-fielders will line up opposite each other on the centerline wing restraining lines. Defenders, attackmen and the goalie must stay behind the defense and attack restraining lines until possession is called. The referee will call set, backup 2 paces and then blow his whistle to start the face-off. The center mid-fielders will work to gain possession. Wing mid-fielders can move off their restraining lines and participate in gaining possession. If a center midfield moves his stick after the referee has called set and before the referee has blown his whistle this is a technical foul and the referee will award the ball to the opponent center midfield player for a free possession. Players in the attack and defense positions are to hold their position behind the restraining line until the referee has called possession. Once the face-off takes place and possession has been gained, the referee will indicate possession and all remaining players are released to participate in the play. If the ball goes out of bounds before possession is gained, then the face-off will be performed again. If an offensive or defensive player leaves the restraining area to play the ball before the referee indicates possession, it is a non-possession technical foul and the ball is awarded to the other team. If the ball enters the restraining area before the referee indicates possession, the offensive and defensive players may play the ball, but may not leave the restraining area until possession is indicated. If the ball enters the crease, it is the goalie’s ball.

(Faceoff note): when one team achieves a four point score differential, the scored-upon team will begin play at the midfield line in a free clear situation until the goal differential is reduced to under 4 goals.)

Goalie and the Goal Crease: The goalie is fully protected within the crease. No player may touch the goalie or his stick while he is in the crease. The goalie is considered within the crease if any part of his body is touching the crease. If the goalie is in the crease and traps the ball with his stick, then the ball is considered the goalie’s ball. This rule applies whether the ball is inside or outside the crease. Only the goalkeeper is permitted to use his hands to bat the ball away from the goal while he is within the crease. The goalie may not use his hands to catch the ball. The 4 second goalie count is started once the goalie is in possession of the ball while in the crease. Failure by the goalie to advance the ball from the crease shall result in loss of possession and the opposing team will be awarded a free clear at the midfield line. Restarts after fouls, ball out of bounds, or other stoppages: All restarts will occur with one team being awarded the ball in-bounds near where the ball exited the field or near where play was stopped. Players from the opposing team shall position themselves in bounds no nearer than 5 yards from the player with ball possession. The referee’s whistle and arm signal shall indicate the restart of play.

Defensive Possessions: If the referee cannot determine who gets possession of the ball, the referee shall award the ball under the alternate possession rule Out of bounds by shot on goal: If a player from team A shoots on goal and the ball travels out of bounds along the end line or side line, possession will be awarded to the team closest to the spot where the ball went out of bounds at the time the ball went out of bounds. In many cases, if no one is behind the goal, the goalie will be closest player to the spot where the ball went out of bounds when it left the field. In this situation, the goalie’s team will be awarded the ball to restart play. The team gaining possession will start the ball in bounds where the ball went out of bound and opposing players must be 5-yards away. Fouls and Penalties: The safety of players is the guideline that governs the rule interpretation of appropriate contact between players. Any play utilizing more force than necessary to accomplish legal, grade-level play is illegal. Contact outside the grade-level guidelines is a foul and the appropriate Personal or Technical penalty must be applied.

EXCESSIVE CONTACT IS NEVER PERMITTED A foul is a prohibited action by a field player, team member, coach or fan against a player, team member, referee, coach or fan of the opposing team. Fouls are either Personal or Technical in nature. Personal fouls result in timeserving penalties against the team or player committing the act. Technical fouls can result in either timeserving or non-time serving penalties. The player’s team shall play short-handed until the offending player completes the penalty time or a goal is scored on the short-handed team. Non-time-serving penalties shall result in the awarding of ball possession to the offended team. Penalty Enforcement: When a penalty is time serving, the offending player shall report to the penalty area for the duration of the penalty. In either case, the player must remain out of play for the duration of the penalty. The offended team shall be awarded the ball at a sideline near where the foul was committed or at the centerline if the offense was committed in the team’s defensive zone (a free clear for personal fouls). The referee will whistle and signal for the game to continue. Penalty time will start once the referee restarts play.

Personal Fouls: Personal fouls are illegal acts directed toward a team or team member. Personal fouls are serious in nature. The penalty for a personal foul shall be suspension from the game for one to three minutes.

The following are prohibited actions in the game of lacrosse:

Body Checks – The objective of a body check is to dislodge the ball from an opposing player or to stop the player from advancing with the ball. A body check may only be applied to the player within five yards of the ball. The check must be made below the shoulders, above the waist and from the side or front. The player must not lead with his head or shoulders lowered, and both hands must be on his stick. A player may not make a body check to an opposing player who is on the ground. Body check fouls will also be called should the body check result in a takeout check, spearing or any other illegal contact.

Slashing – Slashing is the uncontrolled use of a stick in an effort to check an opponent’s stick. No overhead checks, one handed checks or wrap around checks are allowed. A stick check that does not make controlled contact on the ball carrier’s stick or gloved hand(s) while on the stick shall be a called a slash . The player making the contact must have two hands on his stick and not come from more than a 90 degree angle. Contact elsewhere on the body may result in a slash call including checks that hit the opponent’s torso, upper arms, face or head. A player does not need to make contact with the opponent for the referee to make a slashing call. Other slashing calls will result from one handed swings, wrap around checks or break 90 degrees even if legal contact is made. Note: No slashing will be called if the pivot point for a slap check occur from the wrists with no more than a 90 degree arc. No full arm (baseball) swing slap checks allowed.

Cross Check – A player may not check his opponent with the exposed shaft of his stick. This is defined as the stick area between the gloved hands or the butt end of their shaft below the gloved hands. A player may push off, or extend it outward from the body in a cross check position. Tripping - A player may not use his body or stick to trip an opponent below the waist. Unnecessary roughness - Hits toward head, neck, or contact that is deemed by the referee to be avoidable or excessive in nature shall be prohibited. A larger player may not run over a smaller player. During face-offs, the referees will watch for blows to the head from an opponent’s helmet, using the head to lead in the check (spearing).

Any contact to an opponent’s head will be considered unnecessary roughness. Any play utilizing more force than necessary to accomplish legal, grade-level play will result in an unnecessary roughness call.

Unsportsmanlike conduct – All players, coaches and fans shall conduct themselves in a sportsmanlike manner. Examples of unsportsmanlike conduct includes throwing of the crosse or other player equipment, cursing, posturing towards another player (includes taunting), arguing a call, showing disrespect to the referee, and inappropriate comments or unruly behavior from players, coaches, or fans. Improper Equipment – Players shall wear required equipment whenever they participate in youth lacrosse games. Players not wearing legal equipment (non-altered) equipment) shall not be allowed to play until the equipment is corrected. (This does not include players whose legal equipment comes off during normal play). Examples of illegal equipment include using a stick of improper length, playing with altered or illegal gloves, or playing in a non-NOCSAE approved helmet. Players must keep their mouth guards in whenever they are on the field.

Technical Fouls: Technical fouls are fouls that impact the fairness and flow of the game but are not directed toward an opposing team or team member. For technical fouls, a player will receive a 30-second penalty is the offended team had possession of the ball. If the offended team did not have possession of the ball, a technical foul will result in possession of the ball where the foul occurred.

The following are technical fouls: Holding – A player may not grab or hold another player with his stick or free hand. If a player has the ball, the defensive player may stop the offensive player's forward progress legally from the front or side by positioning himself legally. If a player of one team is backing into an opponent, the opponent may establish a legal position and hold from the rear only if equal pressure is applied. The 5-yard / possession rule applies in all cases.

Interference – A player may not interfere with the free movement of an opponent unless the opponent has the ball or is within 5 yards of the ball. If the player is within 5 yards of the ball, a player may check or hold the opponent’s cross using his cross or may impede the other player from the front or side by establishing a legal screening position.

Pushing – Players may not push or shove an opponent from behind. Typically, this penalty is called during a loose ball situation when one player pushes another from behind during an attempt to scoop a ground ball. Defensive players must exert pressure equal to that of the offensive player if the offensive player is backing into the defensive player.

Referees are encouraged to tightly call pushing.

Offside – Each team must keep four players (usually the goalie and three defensemen) in their defensive half of field and three players (usually three attack) in the offensive half. Offside is a technical foul. A goalie can advance the full-length of the field, but four players must remain in the defensive half of the field.

Crease Violation – The goalie and his stick may not be touched if he is within or has any part of his body touching the goal crease. If the goalie has control of the ball in his stick and contact is made, the defending team shall be awarded the ball at midfield. If the goalie doesn’t yet have possession, the loose ball shall be awarded to a teammate near the sideline laterally from the goal. If an attacking player enters the crease while the defending team is in possession, it will result in a 30 second technical foul. If the attacking team has possession of the ball and an attacking player enters the crease, the ball will be awarded to the defending team. If an attacking player scores while diving into the crease, the goal will be disallowed.

Illegal Offensive Screen – A player may set a “pick” for a teammate. Players setting an offensive pick must be stationary, motionless, and have his stick next to his body. The player setting the pick may not lean sideways into the opponent to impede the opponent’s pursuit. Warding– A player may not use his free hand to keep the defensive player or the defensive player's stick away his crosse. Also, the player with ball possession may not push off the opponent even with his arm or elbow with his hands holding his crosse in order to gain an advantage.

Conduct – Conduct fouls are similar to unsportsmanlike conduct, but more minor in nature. Excessive celebration after goal is an example. Whenever possible, referees are encouraged to call a Conduct foul before escalation to Unsportsmanlike Conduct occurs. Referee enforcement: Most fouls are immediate whistle with play stoppage except when the offensive team is in possession of the ball. The referee will employ the slow-whistle, flag down technique when calling personal or technical fouls on the defense while the offensive team is in possession of the ball. Slow whistles with flag down include, but not limited to: body checks, unnecessary roughness, cross slashing, cross checking, off sides, holding, interference, pushing, etc. A player accumulating four personal fouls will result in immediate expulsion from the game.

Addressing the Referee: Youth lacrosse players on the field, including captains, may not address a referee. Only coaches are to address the referee, only during timeouts or halftime and in a manner that seeks clarification, not confrontation. Both coaches must be present when addressing a referee. A player, coach or fan entering into an argument with the referee will receive a one-minute, non-releasable, unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. End of game: At the end of the game, each team will line up and shake the hands of each member of the opposing team. Goalies shall lead the handshake line. Teams shall display good sportsmanship during the handshake line.


 


5th/6th Grade Boys Rules Game Objective: The objective of the game is to move the ball using the crosse (stick) to score a goal. Kicking the ball is permitted. The ball may be kicked into the goal.

Field: Fields will be 110 x 60 where possible but no less than 100yds in length by 55 yds wide. Markings will include sidelines, backlines, goal creases, center line with midfield wing restraining lines and attack and defense restraining lines parallel with the center line and 20yds from the center line. Teams will occupy one side of the field and parents/fans will occupy the other. No parents are allowed on the team side.

Positions: Each team will start with 10 players on the field: Three attack, three midfielders, three defenders and one goalie. Game Duration, Time Outs: Games will comprised of two 25 minute halves. Halftime will be 5 minutes long. Referees will request the home coach to assign someone to manage the game clock and the penalty clock.

Each team is allowed two time outs per half (one minute in duration). The clock will be stopped during time outs. Referees: There will be two referees officiating a game. All referees will be certified referees.

Body Checks: Body checking is limited to pressure being applied from a players gloved hands and forearms while holding onto the stick. Player must be in control with good body position encouraged. No collision style or take out checks are allowed.

Defense Long Sticks: Defense long sticks will not be allowed in games. This is to help ensure that all players learn how to handle a short stick before attempting to handle a long stick. Scoring: Official scoring will not be kept; however when one team achieves a four point score differential, the scored-upon team will begin play at the midfield line in a free clear situation until the goal differential is reduced to under 4 goals.

Required Equipment: All players must wear a helmet (helmet must be NOCSAE certified), gloves, shoulder pads, arm pads, protective cup, and a colored mouth guard. Players may not participate in the game without being properly equipped with all the required protective equipment. Should a piece of protective equipment become dislodged during the course of play, play will be stopped so the player can recover the missing equipment. Players may not participate in play without a stick. Stick length is 40 to 42 inches for short sticks and 40 to 72 inches for goalie sticks. Long poles are not permitted. Playing with improper equipment may result in a one to three minute, non-releasable, personal foul.

Face Offs: Face-offs occur at the start of each half and after each goal scored. Two mid-fielders will take positions at the center of the field for the face-off. The other mid-fielders will line up opposite each other on the centerline wing restraining lines. Defenders, attackmen and the goalie must stay behind the defense and attack restraining lines until possession is called. The referee will call set, backup 2 paces and then blow his whistle to start the face-off. The center mid-fielders will work to gain possession. Wing mid-fielders can move off their restraining lines and participate in gaining possession. If a center midfield moves his stick after the referee has called set and before the referee has blown his whistle this is a technical foul and the referee will award the ball to the opponent center midfield player for a free possession. Players in the attack and defense positions are to hold their position behind the restraining line until the referee has called possession. Once the face-off takes place and possession has been gained, the referee will indicate possession and all remaining players are released to participate in the play. If the ball goes out of bounds before possession is gained, then the face-off will be performed again. If an offensive or defensive player leaves the restraining area to play the ball before the referee indicates possession, it is a non-possession technical foul and the ball is awarded to the other team. If the ball enters the restraining area before the referee indicates possession, the offensive and defensive players may play the ball, but may not leave the restraining area until possession is indicated. If the ball enters the crease, it is the goalie’s ball.

(Faceoff note): when one team achieves a four point score differential, the scored-upon team will begin play at the midfield line in a free clear situation until the goal differential is reduced to under 4 goals.)

Goalie and the Goal Crease: The goalie is fully protected within the crease. No player may touch the goalie or his stick while he is in the crease. The goalie is considered within the crease if any part of his body is touching the crease. If the goalie is in the crease and traps the ball with his stick, then the ball is considered the goalie’s ball. This rule applies whether the ball is inside or outside the crease.

Only the goalkeeper is permitted to use his hands to bat the ball away from the goal while he is within the crease. The goalie may not use his hands to catch the ball. Restarts after fouls, ball out of bounds, or other stoppages: All restarts will occur with one team being awarded the ball in-bounds near where the ball exited the field or near where play was stopped. Players from the opposing team shall position themselves in bounds no nearer than 5 yards from the player with ball possession. The referee’s whistle and arm signal shall indicate the restart of play. If the referee cannot determine who gets possession of the ball, the ball will be awarded under the alternate possession rule.

Defensive Possession: If the referee cannot determine who gets possession of the ball, the ball will be awarded under the alternate possession rule. Out of bounds by shot on goal: If a player from team A shoots on goal and the ball travels out of bounds along the end line or side line, possession will be awarded to the team closest to the spot where the ball went out of bounds at the time the ball went out of bounds. In many cases, if no one is behind the goal, the goalie will be closest player to the spot where the ball went out of bounds when it left the field. In this situation, the goalie’s team will be awarded the ball to restart play. The team gaining possession will start the ball in bounds where the ball went out of bound and opposing players must be 5-yards away. Fouls and Penalties: The safety of players is the guideline that governs the rule interpretation of appropriate contact between players. Any play utilizing more force than necessary to accomplish legal, grade-level play is illegal. Contact outside the grade-level guidelines is a foul and the appropriate Personal or Technical penalty must be applied.

EXCESSIVE CONTACT IS NEVER PERMITTED. A foul is a prohibited action by a field player, team member, coach or fan against a player, team member, referee, coach or fan of the opposing team. Fouls are either Personal or Technical in nature. Personal fouls result in timeserving penalties against the team or player committing the act. Technical fouls can result in either timeserving or non-time serving penalties. The player’s team shall play short-handed until the offending player completes the penalty time or a goal is scored on the short-handed team. Non-time-serving penalties shall result in the awarding of ball possession to the offended team. Penalty Enforcement: When a penalty is time serving, the offending player shall report to the penalty area for the duration of the penalty. The offended team shall be awarded the ball at a sideline near where the foul was committed or at the centerline if the offense was committed in the team’s defensive zone (a free clear for personal fouls). The referee will whistle and signal for the game to continue. Penalty time will start once the referee restarts play.

Personal Fouls: Personal fouls are illegal acts directed toward a team or team member. Personal fouls are serious in nature. The penalty for a personal foul shall be suspension from the game for one to three minutes.

The following are prohibited actions in the game of lacrosse:

Body Checks – The objective of a body check is to dislodge the ball from an opposing player or to stop the player from advancing with the ball. A body check may only be applied to the player within five yards of the ball. Body checking is limited to controlled contact applied from a player’s gloved hands on stick and forearms while trying to maintain or establish good body position. The player’s check must be made to the opposing player below the shoulders, above the waist and from the side or front. The player cannot lead with his head or shoulders lowered. A player may not make a body check to an opposing player who is on the ground. Body check fouls will also be called should the body check result in a collision style, takeout, spearing or any other form of illegal body contact.

Note: A body check (collision style check) where body-to-body contact is made by an offensive player with the objective of driving through, knocking down or “taking out” the opposing player is also an illegal body check.

The following are permissible forms of incidental body contact: Ground balls: If contact occurs while two players are going for a ground ball and both players are bumping one another while working to gain possession of the ball, no infractions will occur as long as contact occurs from the front or from the side. During groundballs, a player may employ a moving pick to interfere with an opponent so that his teammate can get the ball unopposed. The moving pick must start within 5 yards of the ball. The player issuing the moving pick cannot lower his shoulder and can only restrain the other player by applying pressure with the gloved hands together on his stick. He cannot push or clear out the opposing player. If contact occurs while two players are going downfield and both players are bumping one another while working to advance the ball/gain field position, no infractions will occur as long as contact occurs from the side (shoulder to shoulder) and the head or shoulders are not lowered (i.e. to force the player with the ball out of bounds).

Slashing – Slashing is the uncontrolled use of a stick in an effort to check an opponent’s stick. Only two- handed poke or lift checks are allowed. A stick check that does not make controlled contact on the ball carrier’s stick or gloved hand(s) while on the stick shall be a called a slash. The player making the contact must have two hands on his stick and not come from more than a 90 degree angle. Contact elsewhere on the body will result in a slash call including checks that hit the opponent’s torso, upper arms, face or head. A player does not need to make contact with the opponent for the referee to make a slashing call.

Other slashing calls will result from one handed swings, wrap around checks or break 90 degrees even if legal contact is made. Cross Check – A player may not check his opponent with the exposed shaft of his stick. This is defined as the stick area between the gloved hands or the butt end of their shaft below the gloved hands. A player may push off, or extend it outward from the body in a cross check position. Tripping - A player may not use his body or stick to trip an opponent below the waist.

Unnecessary roughness - Hits toward head, neck, or contact that is deemed by the referee to be avoidable or excessive in nature shall be prohibited. A larger player may not run over a smaller player. During face-offs, the referees will watch for blows to the head from an opponent’s helmet, using the head to lead in the check (spearing).

Any contact to an opponent’s head will be considered unnecessary roughness. Any play utilizing more force than necessary to accomplish legal, grade-level play will result in an unnecessary roughness call. Unsportsmanlike conduct – All players, coaches and fans shall conduct themselves in a sportsmanlike manner. Examples of unsportsmanlike conduct includes throwing of the crosse or other player equipment, cursing, posturing towards another player (includes taunting), arguing a call, showing disrespect to the referee, and inappropriate comments or unruly behavior from players, coaches, or fans.

The penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct is a one- to three-minute, non-releasable penalty.

Improper Equipment – Players shall wear required equipment whenever they participate in youth lacrosse games. Players not wearing legal equipment (non-altered) equipment) shall not be allowed to play until the equipment is corrected. (This does not include players whose legal equipment comes off during normal play). Examples of illegal equipment include using a stick of improper length, playing with altered or illegal gloves, or playing in a non-NOCSAE approved helmet. Players must keep their mouth guards in whenever they are on the field. Technical Fouls: Technical fouls are fouls that impact the fairness and flow of the game but are not directed toward an opposing team or team member. For technical fouls, a player will receive a 30-second penalty is the offended team had possession of the ball. If the offended team did not have possession of the ball, a technical foul will result in possession of the ball where the foul occurred.

The following are technical fouls: Holding – A player may not grab or hold another player with his stick or free hand. If a player has the ball, the defensive player may stop the offensive player's forward progress legally from the front or side by positioning himself legally. If a player of one team is backing into an opponent, the opponent may establish a legal position and hold from the rear only if equal pressure is applied.

The 5-yard / possession rule applies in all cases. Interference – A player may not interfere with the free movement of an opponent unless the opponent has the ball or is within 5 yards of the ball. If the player is within 5 yards of the ball, a player may check or hold the opponent’s cross using his cross or may impede the other player from the front or side by establishing a legal screening position. Pushing – Players may not push or shove an opponent from behind. Typically, this penalty is called during a loose ball situation when one player pushes another from behind during an attempt to scoop a ground ball.

Defensive players must exert pressure equal to that of the offensive player if the offensive player is backing into the defensive player. Referees are encouraged to tightly call pushing. Offside – Each team must keep four players (usually the goalie and three defensemen) in their defensive half of field and three players (usually three attack) in the offensive half. Offside is a technical foul. A goalie can advance the full-length of the field, but four players must remain in the defensive half of the field.

Crease Violation – The goalie and his stick may not be touched if he is within or has any part of his body touching the goal crease. If the goalie has control of the ball in his crosse and contact is made, the defending team shall be awarded the ball at midfield. If the goalie doesn’t yet have possession, the loose ball shall be awarded to a teammate near the sideline laterally from the goal. . If an attacking player enters the crease while the defending team is in possession, it will result in a 30 second technical foul. If the attacking team has possession of the ball and an attacking player’s body enters the plane of the crease while shooting, scoring or not, this is a crease violation. If a goal is scored, it will be disallowed and the ball will be awarded to the defending team.

Illegal Offensive Screen – A player may set a “pick” for a teammate. Players setting an offensive pick must be stationary, motionless, and have his stick next to his body. The player setting the pick may not lean sideways into the opponent to impede the opponent’s pursuit. Warding– A player may not use his free hand to keep the defensive player or the defensive player's stick away his crosse.

Also, the player with ball possession may not push off the opponent even with his arm or elbow with his hands holding his crosse in order to gain an advantage. Conduct – Conduct fouls are similar to unsportsmanlike conduct, but more minor in nature. Excessive celebration after goal is an example. Whenever possible, referees are encouraged to call a Conduct foul before escalation to Unsportsmanlike Conduct occurremce.

Referee enforcement: Most fouls are immediate whistle with play stoppage except when the offensive team is in possession of the ball. The referee will employ the slow-whistle, flag down technique when calling personal or technical fouls on the defense while the offensive team is in possession of the ball. Slow whistles with flag down include, but not limited to: body checks, unnecessary roughness, cross slashing, cross checking, off sides, holding, interference, pushing, etc. A player accumulating four personal fouls will result in immediate expulsion from the game. Addressing the Referee: Youth lacrosse players on the field, including captains, may not address a referee.

Only coaches are to address the referee, only during timeouts or halftime and in a manner that seeks clarification, not confrontation. Both coaches must be present when addressing a referee. A player, coach or fan entering into an argument with the referee will receive a one-minute, non-releasable, unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. End of game: At the end of the game, each team will line up and shake the hands of each member of the opposing team. Goalies shall lead the handshake line. Teams shall display good sportsmanship during the handshake line.