NCAA Eligibility Center
Information & Resources for the College-Bound Student-Athletes

*2010-11 Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete
*Academic Certification
......Divisions I, II and III Initial-Eligibility Requirements
......FAQs
* National Letter of Intent.
......Frequently Asked Questions
*Recruiting & Eligibility Information
This section provides information for student-athletes and coaches on recruiting rules and regulations. It includes links to convenient sport-specific calendars, as well as definitions of key recruiting-related terminology. Also included is a guide for student-athletes interested in transferring to another college or university.

*NCAA Amateurism Certification
College BoardCollege Planning Made Easy
Inside Source for College Admission Requirements


Search for Colleges
Register for SAT
Prepare for SAT

Test Dates & Fees

Official test scores must be sent from the testing agency to the NCAA Eligibility Center (formerly the NCAA Clearinghouse) using code 9999.
Test scores that appear on a high school transcript will not be accepted.
More Info
beRecruited.com
CONNECTING HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES & COLLEGE COACHES
Recruiting Time Line
Link
This is a general lay-out of the schedule or "time line" that a high school baseball player can follow, in an effort to play baseball at the college level. This time line was developed by getting input from former college players, parents, college coaches and high school and college academic advisers.
Recruiting Definitions
Useful definitions to use with the calendars.
NCAA Division I Baseball Recruiting Calendar
August 1, 2010 through July 31, 2011

Information for Players, Coaches & Parents
Link
Probably the single most valuable piece of information
on the High School Baseball Web
Myths & Realities about College Athletics & Recruting

Myth: If you are good enough, coaches will find you.
Reality:
Recruiting is now a global process and despite your skills or success in high school, it is extremely easy to be overlooked by college coaches who have thousands of athletes to scout and hundreds of potential venue’s to scout them at. College coaches don’t read your local town paper and they probably don’t attend your games and only the top 1% of high school athletes are truly discovered.
More info

You Will Need to Work Hard to Earn a College Spot
The numbers below are a rough estimate of how few college roster spots are available to players entering the college arena. They demonstrate how hard you will have to work and how pro-active you will need to be with your search if you are serious about wanting to play college ball.
According to the figures, your competition may include as many as 61,000 high school graduates and junior college players seeking to transfer to a 4-year school. That doesn't even account for potential recruits in Puerto Rico, Australia and Canada who are being pursued by college coaches.
As you can se in the chart, only 6,800 of these players or 11% (1 out of every 9)will ever have the opportunity to play college baseball at any level. Very few roster spots are available, so you will ned to work hard both on and off the field to stand out from the crowd.

Over 61,000 Players Compete for The Chance to Play!

. . ASSUMPTIONS . . HS . . JC/CC . . TOTAL
TEAMS Actual number of teams in US . . 15,720 . . 377 . . 16,097
PLAYERS 15/HS team & 25/JC team . . 235,800 . . 9,425 . . 245,225
GRADUATES 9 HS players/team & 15 JC players/team . . 141,480 . . 9,425 . . 150,905
WANT TO PLAY 4 HS players/team & 8 JC players/team . . 56,592 . . 4,713 . . 61,305
Roster Spots Only Available for 1 out of Every 9 Players Who Want to Play!

DIVISIONS . . # SCHOOLS . . ROSTER SIZE . . FRESHMEN SPOTS . . % WHO PLAY
NCAA D-I . . 281 . . 7,025 . . 1,405 . . 2%
NCAA D-II . . 214 . . 5,350 . . 1,070 . . 2%
NCAA D-III . . 309 . . 7,725 . . 1,545 . . 3%
NAIA . . 180 . . 4,500 . . 900 . . 1%
NJCAA . . 377 . . 9,425 . . 1,885 . . 3%
Totals . . 1,361 . . 34,025 . . 6,805 . . 11%

*Assumes each college class – freshmen, sophomore, junior, senior, fifth year seniors – make up 20% of the roster


Taken from the High School Player’s Guide to College Baseball