Last Updated: October 13, 2017

Memories:
A History of the
North Dufferin Baseball League



(Image) Memories: A History of the North Dufferin Baseball League, by Tom Anderson

Published 1980

- Contents -

FOREWARD
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
EARLY YEARS
1930 - 1944
1945 - 1960
1961 - 1972
1973 - 1979
THE FUTURE
ALL-STAR GAMES
A TRIBUTE TO UMPIRES
CHALLENGE CUP
TROPHIES
IN CLOSING




"Men may come and men may go,
but I hope old baseball memories
live on forever."

(Roy Tipling)




Foreward

First steps towards this baseball history were taken when an organization meeting of interested history minded people was held in my residence on January 28, 1978.

The 1978 league executive officially launched this project of a history of baseball for The North Dufferin Baseball League, by appointing Tom Anderson as the person responsible for co-ordinating this vast project. Tom was appointed because the executive felt they needed a young, bright and conscientious person to collect and compile the materials for this book. He has been an active player in the N.D.B.L. with Lisle since 1970 and first joined the league executive in 1979 in the office of Vice-President.

Why a book on the history of organized baseball in the North Dufferin League? Suddenly our baseball past was important.

This book does not purport to be definitive history of baseball in North Dufferin. This task would involve several volumes, but this is the most complete account of the subject yet assembled.

I hope this book, in pictures and text will interest and delight the readers.

Adrian Maes
Past President, N.D.B.L.


(Photo) Shelburne Baseball Team, 1929
SHELBURNE BASEBALL TEAM - 1929
L-R Alex McGee, Fred Armstrong, Len Madill, Fred Hunter, Harry Crawford, Jack Jones, Myrill Dean, Pete Hockley (Missing: Roy Tipling)

(Photo from Len Madill)




Preface

The research and writing of the North Dufferin Baseball League history was by no means an easy job, especially since official records were not kept by the league until the early 1970's. It required many hours of searching through old newspapers and talking to both past and present players, organizers and supporters who have been involved in the league over its long history. However, this task was made much easier by the helpfulness of everyone concerned. A great deal of thanks is extended to those people who provided information and photographs.

Unfortunately there were some results I failed to uncover in my hunt for information. These results were not documented in any research material I found and it is understandable that the people I talked to could not recollect certain events taking place 40 to 50 years ago.

These missing results include the final game of the 1930 season between Shelburne and Horning's Mills which was needed to break a first place tie. The contest was to be held in Horning's Mills, but it is questionable if the game was indeed played.

Another problem involved the winners of the championship cup, since a number of name plaques were missing during the earlier years. All winners were finally tracked down with the exception of those winning in 1936 and 1946. The cup, however, may not have been presented during these two seasons for one reason or another.

The championship cup also holds no names for the seasons from 1940 to 1945. I attribute this to the Second World War when, although baseball was still played in the area, the league was never officially formed and therefore the cup was never presented.

It is possible some readers may know and be able to present the true results to these and other queries, but for now they remain unknown.

I would like to express my thanks to "The Creemore Star", and Shelburne's "Free Press and Economist", for making their past newspapers available, which assisted greatly in providing factual and informative accounts of the league for much of its history.

A special thanks goes to Mr. Roy Tipling. His memories of the many years he was involved in the league as a player, coach and organizer proved invaluable in the writing of this book and his assistance was greatly appreciated.

- Tom Anderson




Introduction

Memories of baseball take us back to the year 1930 and the Major Leagues. The National League was in its fifty-fourth season of operation, the American League in its twenty-ninth. Nineteen-thirty was the year Joe Cronin, later to become American League president, won the most valuable player award and Babe Ruth hit 49 homeruns and led the league for the tenth time in that category. It was the year Lou Gehrig of the Yankees topped the majors with an amazing 174 runs batted in and Lefty Grove topped all other pitchers in victories, earned run average, and strikeouts, and led his Philadelphia Athletics to a World Series victory over the St. Louis Cardinals.

Baseball was booming and boys all over the country dreamed someday they would become the next homerun king or the next strikeout king of the majors. But for many, it would remain only a dream, and their exploits would be confined to the small county and small town leagues throughout the country. In 1930 one such small county league was formed in central Ontario, called the North Dufferin Baseball League.

Starting with only four teams, it has expanded into a popular league involving as many as 13 teams in one season and towns from four different counties. For years the league has provided good entertainment and enjoyment for both participants and spectators alike. There have ben excellent teams, excellent players, great games and exciting plays through the years.

One such reputed play was a single-handed triple play by Shelburne's shortstop Frank Paget in 1950. With runners on first and second, Paget caught the line drive, turned to touch the runner caught off second base and chased down the first base runner who was nearly at second on the hit.

The league has also had a few less spectacular moments, but no less amazing, in the past years. A series between Horning's Mills Maple Leafs and Creemore Greys was one to be well remembered, though not for outstanding ball playing. The year was 1938 and the top two teams in the regular season met in a best of three finals for the North Dufferin League championship, in what was expected to be a closely fought contest. The series, which was extended to four games, ended with a total of 117 runs being scored for an average of nearly 29 runs a game. Creemore won the series, outscoring Horning's Mills 75 to 42. It was an amazing series that probably will never be matched in total run production.

The league has indeed had many great moments in the past, with the first Strother Cup being won by Honeywood in 1931, Shelburne's unequalled record of four successive championships from 1957 to 1960, the fierce rivalry of Clarksburg and Lisle in the sixties, Mansfield's underdog championship in 1964 and New Lowell's amazing record of 37 wins, 3 ties and only 2 losses in 1977.

The North Dufferin Baseball League has been in operation for 50 years and has produced some very special and cherished memories in its first half century of existence.

(Photo) Ken McCartney
KEN McCARTNEY
was a well-known left-handed pitcher in the early and mid-50s, playing with Creemore and other teams, largely in tournament play.

(Photo) An Early Everett Ball Team
AN EARLY EVERETT BALL TEAM
Back Row: Billy Wilkinson, P; Mr. Campbell; Tom Murphy, 3B; Art Atkinson, RF; Dr. Smale, 1B; A.R. Kidd, SS.
Front Row: Guy Lemon, LF; Herb Wilkinson, C; Billy McCrea, M; Bob Wilson, 2B; Herb Shepherd, CF.

(Photo) An Everett Ball Team about 1916
AN EVERETT BALL TEAM ABOUT 1916
Back Row: Franklin Crosbie, Bill Ruthven, Frank Rusk, Edgar Jenkins.
Centre Row: Cecil Wilkinson, Dennis Bergin.
Front Row: Jim Murphy, Elmer Jenkins, George Henderson.




Early Years

Prior to 1930, baseball in the Dufferin County area was a very popular sport. Nearly every small village had a local ball team with places like Terra Nova, Whitfield, Corbetton, Dunedin, Singhampton and Redickville all hosting teams at one time or another.

There was one team formed in the 1920's near Horning's Mills known as the "Madills" or "Melancthon Stars." The team consisted of seven brothers, Bill, Harold, Russ, Cecil, Len and Manson, and two cousins, Neil and Earl, all of who were Madills.

With baseball parks not always available, games were played wherever space permitted which usually meant a local farmer's field or cow pasture, and unfortunately for some players, occasionally proved a bit messy when they didn't watch their step. The man with the keenest eye and quickest step would pace off the distance to the bases and line up the pitcher's slab to get the game started.

Baseball was well organized in the area, following the official rules of the time. The big events were tournaments and garden parties held throughout Dufferin County and the surrounding counties, with two of the biggest being the 3rd of June "Orange Young Britons" tournament in Creemore and the July 1st tournament at Mansfield. They offered total prizes of as much as $80.00, bringing in teams from Barrie, Collingwood, and the Toronto area, as well as the many local teams. An entrance fee of $2.00 was often required, to be refunded when the team took to the field. It was not unusual to have over 1000 fans in attendance at these tournaments.

Other popular days were the Civic Holiday tournament at Horning's Mills, U.F.O. picnics at Hillsburgh, field days at Honeywood and garden parties at Maple Valley. These events brought people from miles around, coming by way of horse and buggy or the old Model "T", regardless of time or date. Opening ceremonies sometimes included pipe bands like the Highlanders from Mount Forest and along with baseball play there were usually horseshoe pitches, softball games, football games, races, tug-of-war, and even greased pig contests to keep the crowd interested from morning to night.

With baseball being so popular, it was no surprize that the North Dufferin Baseball League was finally organized in 1930. There is no record of the exact people responsible for organizing the league, although many old-time ball players give credit to one man for his leadership in getting it started; Mr. Lancelot C. A. Strother of Horning's Mills. Probable other gentlemen involved in organization included, Rev. David G. Atkinson from Horning's Mills, George E. Foster from Honeywood and Maurice C. Crawford from Shelburne.

Mr. Strother was a wealthy sports-minded man who did a tremendous amount for baseball in Horning's Mills and the surrounding area. He purchased the land which the present site of the Horning's Mills ball park, built the clubhouse, booth, playing field, seats and surrounding screen. He also presented the village's two ball teams with complete uniforms, bats, balls, bases and catcher's equipment. On Monday, Aug. 7th, 1930, the park was officially opened. There was an unveiling ceremony of the memorial to the soldiers from the village who gave their lives in the Great War, and a stone pillar at the northeast corner with a marble tablet inscribed:

(Photo) Stone Piller at Horning's Mills Ball Park
Stone Pillar at north-east corner of
Horning's Mills Ball Park

HORNING'S MILLS
COMMUNITY PARK
PRESENTED BY
L.C.A. STROTHER
1930

The village of Honeywood also felt it was time for a new park and their present day diamond was built and officially opened in 1930. A large turnout of people from miles around were at Honeywood on Thursday, July 25th to witness the dedication of the Community Memorial Park and the unveiling of the Cenotaph erected in memory of four young men of the community who died in the war; George Prentice, John W. Trimble, Fred Alexander and William John Martin.

With new parks being built and interest in the game growing continually stronger, it was obvious this new league had serious plans of starting something that would last and improve for years to come.

(Photo) Mansfield Team, 1915
MANSFIELD TEAM
Approximately 1915
Back Row: Wilfred Thompson, Herb Jennings, Gordon Currie, Leonard Gallaugher.
Middle Row: Wilfred Fleming, Gordon Jamieson, Bob Fleming.
Front Row: Garfield Gilbert, Gordon Walker.

(Photo from Don Campbell)

(Photo) Horning's Mills Maple Leafs, 1930
HORNING'S MILLS MAPLE LEAFS - 1930
First Row, L to R - Harold Madill, Fred Strother, L.C.A. Strother, Rev. D.G. Atkinson, Manson Madill, William Madill.
Second Row - Art Reaburn, Russ Madill, Ken Tweedy, Sandy Hunter, William Yokum.
Third Row - Ross Smith, Neil Madill, Tom Huxtable.

(Photo from Len Madill)




1930 - 1944

It was in late May, 1930 when representatives met to form the small four team league consisting of Shelburne, Honeywood, Horning's Mills Stars and Horning's Mills Maple Leafs. The name, North Dufferin Baseball League, was appropriately chosen and the first year's executive and team representatives were named, as listed below.

1930 EXECUTIVE

President - Rev. David G. Atkinson
Horning's Mills
Vice-President - George E. Foster
Honeywood
Secretary-Treasurer - Maurice C. Crawford
Shelburne

1930 TEAM REPRESENTATIVES

Shelburne - Cecil Madill and Harry Crawford
Honeywood - Selwyn McLean and Harry Smith
Horning's Mills Stars - Jim Redick and Jim Brown
Horning's Mills Maple Leafs - Ross Smith and Neil Madill

Four umpires were selected from the teams with two required to be at each game. To cover the cost of baseballs and other expenditures, it was also decided to charge admission to the games. The fee was 10 cents per person with children admitted free. A schedule was drawn up to give each team a total of six games, three at home and three away. There were no playoffs proposed, with the first place team at the end of the regular schedule to be crowned league champions.

Some of the players who played in the league's initial year were as follows: Honeywood - Harry Smith, Ed Foster, Roy Tipling, Walt Hartley, Ken Anderson, George Tupling, Selwyn McLean, Pete Hartley, Wes Hartley and Howard Major.
Shelburne - Harry Crawford, Ceil Madill, Fred Armstrong, Myrill Dean, Kay White, Len Madill, Roy Bellerby, Gant Puckering, Alex McGhee and E. Tupling.
Horning's Mils Maple Leafs - Ross Smith, Sandy Hunter, William Madill, Manson Madill, Neil Madill, Arthur Reyburn, Clif Hill, Thos. Huxtable, Ken Tweedy, Ross Johnson and Russ Madill.
Horning's Mills Stars - Jim Redick, Harold McGhee, Will Webster, Oscar Fraser, George McGhee, George Fraser, Chas. Webster, Clif McGhee, Carl Bates, Elwood Henry, Jim Brown and Claude bates.

The first game of the North Dufferin Baseball League was played at Honeywood on June 9th, with Honeywood defeating the Horning's Mills Stars. It was the start of the most exciting season of baseball. The league turned out to be a two team race between Shelburne and Horning's Mills Maple Leafs. When the schedule came to a close these two teams were tied for first place with Shelburne having one rained out game to play against Honeywood. A win would give them the championship, a loss would mean a sudden death game against the Leafs to determine the winner. In the re-scheduled game, Honeywood came up with their best effort of the year and defeated a surprized Shelburne team 4-2. This set up the sudden-death final game between Shelburne and Horning's Mills Maple Leafs, but unfortunately, the outcome is unknown.

1930 - SCHEDULE and SCORES
       Visitors             Home

June 9 - Horning's Mills Stars Honeywood (Honeywood won, no score reported) 13 - Shelburne 9 Horning's Mills Maple Leafs 3 16 - Honeywood 2 Shelburne 7 20 - HM Leafs 9 HM Stars 3 25 - HM Leafs 5 Honeywood 3 Shelburne 24 HM Stars 6 30 - Honeywood 6 HM Stars 5 July 4 - HM Leafs 13 Shelburne 9 11 - HM Stars 13 HM Leafs 10 14 - Honeywood 8 HM Leafs 17 18 - HM Stars 1 Shelburne 12 August 14 - Shelburne 2 Honeywod 4

 

 
1930 - FINAL STANDINGS
  W L Pts
SHELBURNE 4 2 8
HM LEAFS 4 2 8
HONEYWOOD 3 3 6
HM STARS 1 5 2


The second season turned out to be as exciting as the first. The league officers remained the same, the same four teams returned and a six game schedule was drawn up. There was an added incentive to win the championship this year, when L.C.A. Strother donated a large silver cup to the league. A perpetual gift, it was to be held by the winning team for one year, upon which their name would be engraved. It was this kind of generosity and support that earned Mr. Strother the title of Honorary President in the league's early years of operation.

There were no playoffs again in 1931. The first place finishers would be champions, which brought about a tremendous finish when Honeywood and Horning's Mills Maple Leafs, tied for the league lead, were scheduled to meet in the last game of the season. The game was played at Horning's Mills before the largest crowd of the year. It was a close contest for three innings with the score tied 4-4, when Honeywood exploded for 5 runs in the 4th inning and 5 runs in the 5th inning to take a commanding lead. The game was finally called on account of darkness, with the Leafs batting in the bottom of the 7th inning. The score reverted back to the 5th inning as ruled by the league, giving Honeywood a 14-7 victory and possession of the Strother Cup in it's initial year.

The following is the line score for the 1931 cup winning game.

 
  1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Honeywood 1 0 3 5 5 1 2
Horning's Mills 2 1 1 0 3 1 1

 

 
1931 - FINAL STANDINGS
  W L Pts
HONEYWOOD 5 1 10
HM LEAFS 4 2 8
SHELBURNE 2 3 4
HM STARS 1 5 2


The league did not take long to expand with a team from Mansfield being admitted in 1932. It was a move the original teams may have regretted, as the new entrants proved to be the first power house team in the league's short history. With players like Herb Jennings, Bob Walker, Charlie Bailey, Charlie Sawyer and Russell Murphy leading the way, Mansfield captured the Strother Cup three consecutive years, from 1932 to 1934. It was not a surprizing feat though, since many people claim that Jennings was the best pitcher to ever perform in the league.

In 1932 the Mansfield team won the championship by virtue of a first place finish in the regular season as was the case the first two years. It was the 1933 season when playoffs were finally introduced into the league. They were drawn up to have the second and third place finishers meet in a sudden death game with the winners to play the first place team in a 2 out of 3 series. It was not a difficult year to make the playoffs however, as the absence of a Shelburne team and only one entry from Horning's Mills brought the league total to only three teams. The Leafs from Horning's Mills defeated Honeywood in the first ever playoff game to advance to the finals, but fell at the hands of the powerful Mansfield club in the final series.

Mansfield won the championship a third straight year before their rivals, the Horning's Mills Maple Leafs, finally toppled them in 1935. Mansfield finished first that year and looked ahead for yet another victory. The Leafs and Shelburne, who tied for second place in the regular schedule, played a sudden death game, with the winner advancing into the finals. Horning's Mills won a close 5-3 contest behind the strong

(Photo) Mansfield Baseball Team – N.D.B.L. Champions 1932
MANSFIELD BASEBALL TEAM - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1932

Top Row, L to R - Wilfred Thompson (OF), Pete Thompson (3B), Delmar Bates (OF), Jas. Shacklady, Charlie Sawyer (P), Herb Jennings (P), Thomas Fines, Lou Kirkpatrick (OF).
Second Row - Gordon Walker (1B), Robert Walker (C).
Bottom Row - Russell Murphy (OF), Ernie Synott (SS), Charlie Bailey (2B), Harry Sawyer (OF), Roscoe Cauthers (OF). Missing: William Madill.

(Photo from Alvin McDonald)

 

(Photo) Mansfield Baseball Team, 1938
MANSFIELD BASEBALL TEAM - 1938

Back Row, L to R - James Cauthers, Gordon Walker, Lorne Wilson, Delmar Bates, Wilmet Mitchell, Elwood Greer, Albert Gennings.
Front Row - Russell Murphy, Robert Walker, Alvin McDonald, Reg Greer, Jack Hines (Coach).

(Photo from Alvin McDonald)


pitching of Ken Tweedy and proceeded on to defeat Mansfield in the finals for their first Strother Cup championship.

The league took a major step in 1937 by accepting a new entry from outside the county when Creemore joined the N.D.B.L. It was also the year Horning's Mills Stars and Horning's Mills Maple Leafs combined to form one team under the latter's name. The new teams from Creemore and Horning's Mills proved to be the best in the league, as they were tied for first place when the schedule ended. A sudden death game was played in Creemore to determine top spot and Horning's Mills came away with a 7-4 victory. The loss of this game forced Creemore to play Shelburne in the single game, semi-final and proved costly for them as Shelburne won an upset victory to advance to the finals. However, Horning's Mills had little trouble with their opponents and behind Ken Tweedy's pitching and the strong play of Don Downey, Manson Madil, Len Madill and the rest of the team, they defeated Shelburne 9-2 and 7-2 to win the cup in two straight games.

In 1938 the league expanded again, accepting Dundalk from neighbouring Grey County. They posed little threat in their first year as Creemore Greys and Horning's Mills Maples Leafs again were the class of the league. These two teams met and were responsible for the unbelievable and amazing high scoring finals of that year.

The first game was played at Creemore and ended in a 12-12 tie, being called on account of darkness after eight innings. It was one which saw the home team take an 11-1 lead after innings, only to have Horning's Mills score 6 runs in the last inning to force the tie. The game was marred by a bad accident, when Earl Madill, right fielder for the Leafs, was hit on the head by a pitched ball and suffered a fractured skull.

In game two, Creemore gained an easy victory winning by a lopsided score of 33-9. Their hitting spree included 24 hits in the seven innings and 14 runs in the third inning alone. Horning's Mills was given little chance of winning the third game, but they showed why they were one of the top teams during the regular season, fighting back to edge Creemore 11-10. This tied the series and forced a final and deciding game. The game was held before a large crowd at the neutral site of Mansfield. (It was customary for all deciding games to be played at a neutral site in the early years of the league).

Creemore's batting power again led the way as they won another high scoring game by a score of 20-10 to capture the Strother Cup for the first time. The Grey's had a strong team and were worthy champions of the league. They were led continually throughout the year by the strong performances from Bill Gowan, Norm Gowan, Roy Tipling, Rupert Weir and Ron Hodgson and well managed by Dr. J. R. H. Graham.

The North Dufferin Baseball League continued to improve each and every year. In 1939 a team from Ivy joined the league. The Ivy Maple Leafs, who had played in many of the tournaments in Creemore and Mansfield in previous years, entered a competitive team into the league with good players like Herman Jennett, and Wilford Davis. They met some tough competition in the defending champions from Creemore, and especially from Mansfield who along with a few players remaining from their earlier championship teams, had added a couple of good young ball players by the names of Alvin "Mac" McDonald and Reg Greer. This Mansfield team took top spot in the regular season with a 6 win, 2 loss record. Ivy finished in second place at 5-3, one game ahead of Creemore who ended up with a 4-4 record. In the semi-finals, the Leafs ousted the 1938 champs from Creemore and continued their fine play into the finals, defeating the league leaders from Mansfield to capture the Strother Cup.

The Second World War that began in September 1939, put a temporary halt to the North Dufferin Baseball League. Many young men from the area went overseas to join the fight and among them were several ballplayers. This left the league short of players and although some teams were still formed and continued to play during the war years, the N.D.B.L. was not officially organized.

(Photo) Ivy Maple Lefas – N.D.B.L. Champions 1939
IVY MAPLE LEAFS - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1939

Back Row, L to R - Owen Quinlan, Mervin Lennox, Elwood Jennett, Ron Stewart, Borden Elliott, Herman Jennett, Wilford Davis.
Middle Row - Ken Elliott, Lawrence Davis, Mike Baker, George Davis, Harry Banting, Jack Scott, Claude Banting.
Front Row - Ken Banting, George Davis Jr., Weldon Elliott, Clarence Hoggarth.

(Photo from Alvin McDonald)





1945 - 1960


When the war ended in 1945, the league started up operation once again. Teams from Shelburne, Mansfield, Creemore and Horning's Mills returned along with two new clubs from Everett, the Leafs and the Sports Club. When it came down to the final series, there were two old rivals, Mansfield and Creemore playing off for the Strother Cup. Mac MacDonald, Reg Greer and Ernie Synott were back leading the way for Mansfield and Creemore was just as strong with the likes of Paddy Young, Roy Tipling, Norris Chalmers and Bill Gowan. The finals went the full five games with the fifth and deciding contest played at the neutral site of Everett, before some 500 fans. Mansfield came out on top of that game, defeating Creemore for the championship.

In 1947 a new entry from Beeton joined the league with a young hard-throwing pitcher by the name of Bob MacMullan on the team. MacMullan, who was raised in Guelph, played Intercounty ball there before moving to Beeton and later to Creemore, where he would perform and star for that team for many years. It was also the year that one of the areas all-time great pitchers, Deverde "Smokey" Smith signed to play for Creemore. Formerly from Collingwood, Smith had played pro ball with Rome, N.Y. of the Canadian-American League earlier in his career. However, at the time of playing Creemore he had bone slivers recently removed from his arm and saw little action because of this. These new players did little to worry the strong Mansfield team and when the finals were over they were once again league champions, beating Creemore in two straight games to capture the cup.

After sitting out a year, Shelburne returned to the league with a better than ever ball team in 1948. It was the start of an era that would see Shelburne win the championship eight times in the next 13 years with six of those coming between 1953-1960. They never ran short of good ballplayers along the way, with Alex Grainger, Keith Burnside, Ken Banks, Russ McDowell and Doug "Tex" Howard to name just a few.

Their first of many championships came in 1948 in an abbreviated league that year of only three teams, Shelburne, Mansfield and Everett. Everett had a strong team with ace pitcher Cecil "Sharkey" Jenkins and Bill Kiernan leading the way and finished in first spot to gain a bye into the finals. Shelburne played Mansfield in the semi-finals, knocking them off two games straight and advanced against the tough Everett team. In the finals, Shelburne came up with a big series defeating the league leaders three games to one.

Again in 1950, Shelburne played outstanding ball in the playoffs. They finished fourth in the regular season for the final playoff spot, but rolled over Everett two straight games in the semi-finals and defeated a surprized Mansfield team three straight games in the finals.

After missing the championship for two years, Shelburne captured

(Photo) Mansfield Baseball Team – N.D.B.L. Champions 1947
MANSFIELD BASEBALL TEAM - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1947

Top Row, L to R - Ron Shacklady (LF), Delmar Bates (RF), Alvin McDonald (P), John Graham (OF), Russell Murphy (OF), Cliff Synott (1B), Robert Walker (C), Harry Sawyer (2B), Harold Cauthers (3B).
Bottom Row: Elwood Greer (CF), James Cauthers (P & SS), William Bates (Sec.-Treas.), Reg Greer (Coach & Manager), Emerson Greer (OF), Ernie Synott (3B).

(Photo from Alvin McDonald)

 

(Photo) Shelburne Baseball Team – N.D.B.L. Champions 1950
SHELBURNE BASEBALL TEAM - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1950

Back Row, L to R - Alex Granger, Andy Savage, Russ Allen, Roy Tipling, Elliott Stutter, Russ McDowell, Ken Banks, Earl Rayburn.
Front Row - Frank Paget, Allen McKelvey, Len Madill, Harold Paget, Arnold Rolsen, Keith Burnside.

(Photo from Len Madill)


the Strother Cup twice more, in 1953 over Horning's Mills and in 1954 over Mansfield.

Between Shelburne's championship years during this time, the cup was won by Mansfield in 1949, Horning's Mills in 1951 and Creemore in 1952.

The 1949 victory turned out to be Mansfield's last championship for 15 years. However, they won it in great style by finishing first in the regular season, beating Everett in the semi-finals and defeating Shelburne three straight in the finals. They showed their real strength in the last game of that series by winning 9-7 after trailing 7-0 earlier in the game.

Horning's Mills came up with one of their strongest teams ever in the early 1950's. With Ron Fraser, Don Downey and Neil Henry leading the way they appeared in the finals three straight years, winning the Strother Cup in 1951.

Creemore's victory in 1952 was the first ever 4 out of 7 series to be played in the league. Their opponents were the defending champions from Horning's Mills and it took them the full seven games before they finally emerged as league champs.

It was the 1957 season that Shelburne started their unequalled record of four consecutive championships. Unlike previous years when Shelburne won the cup after only a mediocre regular season, they now proved unbeatable in both scheduled and playoffs. Finishing in first place in 1957 they beat Honeywood two games straight in the semi-finals and met Riverview in the finals. It was one of the few good years that the Riverview team had, finishing second in the league and advanced to the finals, but they proved no match for the strong Shelburne team who defeated them in three straight games. There was little difference the next year as Shelburne finished first once again, easily beating Mansfield three games to none in the semi-finals and defeating a Shelburne Junior team, who joined that year only, four games to none in the finals.

Their last two championships were earned with final playoff victories over Horning's Mills in 1959 and Honeywood in 1960. It was the end of a great team in Shelburne and may have been the beginning of the end of baseball in that town. Shelburne dropped out of the league in 1965. They re-entered in 1968 but never came close to the success of earlier years and dropped out again in 1978.

Shelburne's toughest opponents during their long reign came from Alliston who joined in 1955. It was only a young team but they had plenty of good ballplayers with the likes of Peter Cameron, Bill Edgar, Mike Whelan and Dennis Moon. Alliston finished third in their first year, behind league leading Shelburne and second place Honeywood. In the playoffs they came on strong and defeated Shelburne four games to one in the semi-finals. Honeywood also had good success in the semi-finals by ousting Riverview in four straight games, but put up little opposition in the finals as Alliston easily beat them four games to one.

The 1956 final season standings were similar to the previous years with Shelburne taking top spot and Alliston again ending up in third place. However, Honeywood and Riverview dropped out of contention and were replaced in playoff spots.

 
FINAL STANDINGS - 1956
  W L T Pts
SHELBURNE 8 1 1 17
HORNING'S MILLS 6 3 1 13
ALLISTON 6 4 0 12
MANSFIELD 4 5 1 9
RIVERVIEW 4 5 1 9
HONEYWOOD 0 10 0 0


Mansfield beat Riverview 6-3 in a sudden death game to gain the final playoff spot, only to be eliminated by a strong Shelburne team in the semi-finals. The other series had Alliston defeating Horning's Mills to set up the final between the years top regular season team, and last years champs.

The series turned out to be a marathon affair which, with tied, protested and rained-out games included, reached a total of 11 games. The last game was finally played in Alliston with the series tied at three wins apiece. In the first inning, Alliston's Mike Scollard reached first base and proceeded to steal second, third finally home for the game's first run. It was a play that quite possibly upset the Shelburne team as Alliston took command and won an easy 12-2 victory for their second consecutive Strother Cup.

(Photo) Creemore Baseball Team – About 1946
CREEMORE BASEBALL TEAM - ABOUT 1946

Back Row: L to R - Bill Gowan, John Weir, Norris Chalmers, Rupert Weir, Claude Patton.
Front Row: Roy Tipling, Doug Hare, Carl Gowan, Norm Gowan, Lew Cherry.

(Photo from Carl Gowan)

 

(Photo) Shelburne Baseball Team – N.D.B.L. 1957
SHELBURNE BASEBALL TEAM - N.D.B.L. 1957

Back Row, L to R - Jim McGuire (Sec.-Treas.), Chuck Sawyers, Russ Allen, Doug Howard, Ray Graham, Ken Banks, Russ McDowell, Earl Besley (Manager).
Front Row - Keith Burnside, Ken Lisk, Andy Savage, Russ Tweedy (Coach), Len Madill, Jerry Loader, Harold Rolston, Bob Madill.

(Photo from Doug Howard)

 

(Photo) Roy 'Tippy' Tipling
ROY 'TIPPY' TIPLING

shown here in a Shelburne uniform in 1947, played in the first North Dufferin Baseball League season in 1930 and was still active as a coach and pinch hitter in the early 1970's.

(Photo) Creemore Baseball Team 1946
CREEMORE BASEBALL TEAM 1946

Front Row, L to R - Roy Tipling, John Weir, Lew Cherry, Bill Warner, Norm Gowan, Paddy Young, Carl Gowan.
Rear Row - Rupe Weir, Bob Elliott, Norris Chalmers, Bill Gowan.

(Photo) Horning's Mills Juniors
HORNING'S MILLS JUNIORS

Many players from this Horning's Mills Juinor team of 1949 later played in the North Dufferin Baseball League.
Front Row - George Fraser (Coach), Lorne Webster (CF), Doug Howard (2B), Ronald Fraser (SS), Earl Lobby (Manager).
Back Row - Dave Butcher (RF), Ivan Halbert (C), Tom Fraser (LF), Morris Wallace (1B), Stewart Looby (P), Jim Wallace (3B).

(Photo by D.H. Palmer, Dundalk)





(Photo) Lisle White Sox – N.D.B.L. Champions 1961
LISLE WHITE SOX - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1961

Back Row, L to R - Dale Scott, Jim Lane, John Guilfoyle, Bud Anderson, Roger Anderson, Bruce Hare.
Front Row - Wilmer Lawson, Brian Nimigeon, Jim Lovegrove, Don Ince, Dave Mills, Fred Garland.

(Mike Nimigeon photo)





1961 - 1972


The 1960's brought a new era to the North Dufferin Baseball League. The league accepted new entries, schedules were lengthened, seasons lengthened and teams which had continually battled for the championship during the first 30 years, were finally forced to move over and make way for new teams and new champions.

The most notable of the teams to join the league in the 1960's were clubs from Clarksburg and Lisle. For over a decade these two teams dominated the league. From 1961 to 1974, Lisle was in the finals nine times, winning five, while Clarksburg was represented seven times, winning three. They also shared the first place trophy ten times since its inception in 1963, with Lisle winning it, eight of those 10 years. (Six times as overall league winners and twice as North Division winners). Each team won the championship in their initial year of play.

Lisle White Sox entered the league in 1961 with a solid ball team, consisting of both veterans and upcoming young players. Behind the coaching of John Guilfoyle and the play of Dale Scott, Wilmer Lawson, Jim Lane and Bud Anderson, the White Sox topped off a very successful season by advancing to, and defeating Everett, 4 games to 3 in the finals to win the championship. Lisle's success was also aided by a young pitcher, Jim Lovegrove, who had lived and started his career in Honeywood, but unfortunately for that team, moved to Lisle in 1961.

The Clarksburg Giants joined the league one year later with a strong ball team that included one of the best players to perform in the league, in pitcher Vern Haines, along with players like Pete Moreau, Walter Goldsmith and Dennis Hutchinson. The Giants finished in second place behind the team from Horning's Mills, and after eliminating Lisle in the semi-finals, met the league leaders in the finals, defeating them 4 games to 1 with one tie. It was an unusual series, with Horning's Mills playing very erratic baseball. In what was otherwise a close series, Clarksburg won the first game 13-3 and the final game 18-0.

The first of five times Lisle played Clarksburg in the finals was in 1962. Lisle placed first in the league, three points ahead of Clarksburg, with a 13 win - 3 loss record. However the Giants were a hot team coming off a good semi-final series against Shelburne which had Vern Haines pitch two one-hit and one no-hit games. Clarksburg continued their good play with Gord McAteer, Gerry Binkley and Howard Campbell turning in top performances and won the championship final in seven games.

In 1965 Lisle again placed first in the league although they needed an extra sudden death game to edge out Alliston for that honour. They met Clarksburg in the finals for the second time and once again the Giants defeated them, this time in eight games. The Clarksburg team relied not only on their strong pitching to win, but also with some keen strategy as they intentionally walked Lisle's batting star Dale Scott on all four trips to the plate in winning the final game 1-0. It is interesting to note, in the 1963 finals, Clarksburg intentionally walked Scott on every trip to the plate, in the fourth game of that series, again winning 1-0.

The last time Clarksburg defeated Lisle in the finals was in 1965. With Jim Lovegrove developing into one of the best pitchers in the league, Dale Scott's continued batting excellence and players like Brain "Rockey" Nimigeon and Roger Anderson becoming all-star performers, it was little wonder that Lisle dominated their rivals from Clarksburg in the last three times they met in the finals. They were victorious in 1966, 1967 and 1971 with Clarksburg winning only one game, that being in the 1971 series. Jim Lovegrove was a major factor in Lisle's success as he pitched the team to all four wins in 1966 and contributed strongly in the '67 and '71 series.

The hold on the championship by Lisle and Clarksburg from 1961 - 1974 was broken by only three teams, each winning the cup twice. Mansfield was victorious in 1964 and 1973, Creemore in 1968 and 1969, and Everett in 1970 and 1972.

The biggest upset in recent years and possibly the biggest upset ever in the league's history, occurred in the 1964 playoffs. Clarksburg Giants led the league, losing only one game all year, and appeared to have little competition in their quest for the championship, as shown in the league's final standings.

 
FINAL STANDINGS - 1964
  W L T Pts
CLARKSBURG 16 1 2 34
LISLE 12 7 1 25
HONEYWOOD 9 8 3 21
MANSFIELD 7 9 4 18
SHELBURNE 8 10 2 18
EVERETT 0 17 2 2


Lisle, Honeywood and Mansfield joined the leaders in the playoffs with the Mansfield team taking the fourth and final playoff spot. This set up the semi-finals with Mansfield playing Lisle and Clarksburg against Honeywood, which turned out to be the biggest surprize of all.

Clarksburg ran into one thing that all teams fear in a playoff series; outstanding pitching. The combination of Arnold Anderson and Bev Ruhl turned in some of the best pitching performances of the year in stopping the mighty Giants in the best of seven playoffs. Arnold Anderson was the winning pitcher in the first and last games of the series by scores of 3-2 and 5-1, losing Honeywood's only game in a close 3-2 contest. Bev Ruhl won the other two games by 5-3 and 4-2 scores. They held the league leaders to a mere 11 runs in the five games, while Honeywood batters led by Glen "Tiny" Laverty and Ruhl outhit and outscored their opponents for the semi-final victory.

In the other semi-final, Mansfield upset Lisle, winning that series in seven games. It was an amazing come-back by the Mansfield team after being down three games to none at one point in the series. The third and fourth place teams advanced to the finals, with both sides confident of victory after their upset wins. As it turned out, Honeywood was a little too overconfident and Mansfield, with Barry Greer, Roy Weatherbee, Alan Morrison and Phil MacDonald leading the way, won the series easily, 4 games to 1. The fourth place team, who barley made the playoffs, had won the North Dufferin championship.

After many years of absence from the league, Creemore re-entered in 1966 with a young team of mainly juinor aged players under the coaching of Carl Gowan. It didn't take them long to mature into an excellent ball team and they proved it by capturing the championship in both 1968 and 1969. Their success was in the strong pitching of Rany MacMullan and Bruce Gowan and the good hitting of players like Paul Walker and Rick McArthur.

Creemore finished in fourth place in 1968 but were only two points behind the league leaders from Lisle. It was one of the closet finishers ever in the league play with the top six teams separated by only three points. Creemore reached the finals by defeating Alliston in the first round and Clarksburg in the second round of playoffs. Their opponents turned out to be Lisle who advanced by ousting Honeywood and New Lowell. In the finals Creemore defeated Lisle in six games.

 
FINAL STANDINGS - 1968
(Top Six)
  W L T Pts
LISLE 11 5 0 22
MANSFIELD 10 4 2 22
NEW LOWELL 10 6 0 20
CREEMORE 10 6 0 20
HONEYWOOD 9 6 1 19
CLARKSBURG 9 6 1 19


The following year, they finished in top spot, met New Lowell in the finals and required seven games before finally capturing the championship. Creemore would have probably remained as a top team in the league for many years had they not dropped out in 1970 to join another league.

Everett's two championships could both be called mild surprizes, although they certainly had a good hitting team with the likes of Orville Jenkins, Grant Jenkins, Willie Gauley and Bruce Jenkins and the good pitching of Mike Boughton and Les Gerrard. In 1970, the teams' first year in the league since 1964, Everett finished sixth in the regular season, nine points out of first place. Their playoff life appeared to be a short one when Owen Sound defeated them in the quarter-finals. However, the winners were found to have used an ineligible player and Everett was awarded the series. They took full advantage of their good fortune by beating New Lowell in the semi-finals and a tough team from Chesley in the finals,

(Photo) Lisle Red Sox – N.D.B.L. Champions 1966
LISLE RED SOX - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1966

Back Row, L to R - Jean Bouvier, Claude Lawson, Dale Scott, Jim Lovegrove, Ralph Lightheart, Bill Patton, John Guilfoyle.
Front Row - Lyle Scott, Frank Wadas, Brian Nimigeon, Bud Anderson, Roy Emerton, Roger Anderson.

(Mike Nimigeon photo)


when they won the last three games to take the series four games to two.

With much the same team in 1972, Everett won their second Strother Cup. This year they finished in third spot, one point out of second place but again proved unbeatable in the playoffs which included four straight victories over Clarksburg in the finals after dropping the first game.

(Photo) Pete Moreau
PETE MOREAU

Photo, taken in 1965 on opening day of Clarksburg's new baseball diamond, of the man who spearheaded and helped build the new park which is named after him.

(Photo) Clarksburg Giants 1966
CLARKSBURG GIANTS 1966

Back Row, L to R - Mike Hammond, Bill Milne, Don Sheridan, Ken Darling (Coach), Ray Rutherford, Peter Moreau, Larry Bowhey.
Front Row - Claire Sheridan, Vern Haines, Les Pyatt, Bob McGugan, Barry Holden.

(Photo) Creemore Braves – N.D.B.L. Champions and O.B.A. Juvenile Finalists
1968 CREEMORE BRAVES
N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS AND O.B.A. JUVENILE FINALISTS

Front Row, L to R - Carl Gowan (Coach), Rick McArthur, Terry Gowan, Harold Meek (Manager).
Rear Row - Barry Corby, Paul Walker, Randy MacMullan, Jim Wines, Bob Forbes, Don Gillis, Robert Hewitt, Brain MacIntosh, Bruce Gowan, Mike Weir.

(Photo) Lisle red Sox – N.D.B.L. Champions 1971
LISLE RED SOX - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1971

Back Row, L to R - Frank Wadas, Gary Basterache, Brian Nimigeon, Wayne Fraser, Bud Anderson, Roger Anderson, Bryan Lawson, Jim Lovegrove, Doug Anderson, Fred David, Dale Scott, Bob Nimigeon.
Front Row - Norm Trott, Bruce Jenkins, Tom Anderson, Clarence Johnson, John Johnson.

(Mike Nimigeon photo)


(Photo) 1st Place Trophy to John Guilfoyle of Lisle 1965




League President Roy Weatherbee presenting 1st Place Trophy to John Guilfoyle of Lisle 1965.



(Photo) 1st Place Trophy to Bud Anderson of Lisle 1966







League President Bev Ruhl presenting 1st Place Trophy to Bud Anderson of Lisle 1966.




1973 - 1979


The start of the 1973 season brought with it a new look. With an all time high of 10 teams, the league was split into two divisions for the first time. The North Division consisted of Clarksburg, Honeywood, Lisle, New Lowell and Creemore, the latter team joining in 1972. The South Division was made up of Mansfield, Everett, Shelburne and two new teams from Alliston and Thornton.

Lisle and Mansfield were league leaders in their respective divisions in 1973. As was expected they met in the finals that year with Lisle having home field advantage, finishing a mere one point ahead of their challenger in the overall standings. However the advantage had little effect on Mansfield as they won the series in a surprizing number of only five games. Their big success was in their powerful batting line-ups. Lisle's pitching could do little to stop the strong hitters led by Phil MacDonald, Paul Greer and ex-Lisle star, Dale Scott, as Mansfield ran up an average of eight runs a game on their way to another Strother Cup.

The next year the same two clubs again led their divisions during the regular season, this time with Mansfield having a one point advantage. Last years' winners were eager for another championship, but in the semi-final they met a hot New Lowell team and went down to defeat. This set up the finals between New Lowell and Lisle, the top two teams in the North Division. It was one of the most exciting finals to be played in many years, starting right from the first game which ended in a 2-2 tie. The two teams traded victories in the next six games and the series was even at three victories and one tie going into the final game at New Lowell. It was a close contest all the way through the game, but Lisle, with players that carried them throughout the year, like Doug Anderson, Wayne Fraser, Rick Buchanan and Rick Gowan, held on to win 7-6 and capture the Strother Cup.

Two relatively new teams in the league, New Lowell Knights who joined in 1967 and Ivy Rangers, who originally joined as Thornton in 1973, along with Mansfield, rose to the top and created a new three-team rivalry in the mid-seventies.

After losing to Lisle in the '74 finals, New Lowell came out with a team that seemed would be unbeatable in the years to come. They were unbeatable in league play and with batters like Bill Patton, Wayne Rowe and Elwin Lightheart leading the way, the Knights started a winning streak that would see them capture top spot in the North Division five straight times from 1975 to 1979. In the South Division, a young team from Ivy battled with Mansfield each year for first place from 1974 to 1977 before Alliston stepped in as top team in this division. It was the playoffs that brought the downfall of New Lowell. In 1975 and 1976 they met and were favoured to defeat Mansfield in the semi-finals both years. However they ran up against the exceptional pitching of lefthander Dave Little. One of the best pitchers in recent years, if not in all the years of the league, he led Mansfield to victories in both semi-finals, getting good defensive support from his teammates and batting support from such players as Greg Greer, Jim Shacklady and Roger Maes.

Mansfield played Ivy Rangers in the finals in 1975 and 1976 after their victories over New Lowell. The Rangers finished as South Division leaders in both years and as the best team in the entire league in 1975, losing only four games.

With Earl Elliot, Ed Patton, Dave Schandlen and Al Elliot among the players leading the Ivy team, they continued their fine play into the finals defeating Mansfield. However it was not an easy task as it first appeared. The Rangers needed a seventh game 10-4 victory to win the championship after being ahead three games to none, at one point in the series. Mansfield avenged the loss in 1976 by defeating the same Ivy team to win the Strother Cup in six games.

In 1977, New Lowell finally overcame their playoff jinx, winning the cup for the first time in the team's history. Behind strong pitching of Jim Halliday and Wayne Lightheart and batting of Paul Walker and Roger Mumberson, they finished the league with an amazing 22 wins, 1 tie, 1 loss record and had little trouble advancing to, and winning the finals with an easy four game sweep of Ivy.

In 1978, New Lowell was once again top team during the regular schedule and advanced easily to the finals before meeting a tough Creemore team. It was Creemore's first year back in the league after a short absence, but they had plenty of talent with Barry Corby, Rick Gowan and Terry Gowan leading the way. Finishing second to rival New Lowell during the year, Creemore came up big in the playoffs, winning the finals, four games to two and capturing the Strother Cup.

New Lowell's fine year of 1977 was almost duplicated again in 1979 when the Knights had a 20 win, 2 tie, 1 loss record in league play and went undefeated in the playoffs. They finished with a four game sweep of the Alliston Leafs in the finals to win their second championship in three years.

(Photo) Mansfield Cubs – N.D.B.L. Champions 1976
MANSFIELD CUBS - N.D.B.L. CHAMPIONS 1976

Back Row, L to R - Terry Shacklady, Adrian Maes, Paul Greer, Dave Purchase, Roger Maes, Dave Little.
Middle Row - Wayne Middleton, Alan Murphy, Barry Greer, Jim Shacklady, Mark Pendleton.
Front Row - Dan Shacklady, Jim Greer, Warren Teeter (Bat Boy), Greg Greer, Richard Cauthers.

(Photo) Alliston Leafs – O.B.A. Juvenile 'D'Champions 1978
ALLISTON LEAFS - O.B.A. JUVENILE 'D' CHAMPIONS 1978

This Alliston team, with the addition of a few older players also played in the N.D.B.L. and captured first place in the South Division. Back Row, L to R - Manager Dennis Moon, Roger Rutledge, Steve Hare, Terry Horan, announcer Bob Doner, Art Doner, Darrell Thompson, Tim Edgar and coach Dan Doner.
Front Row - Greg Ludlow, Ross McCague, Barry McCague, team captain Don Sabourin, pitcher Barry Orser and Mike Heatherington. Absent when picture taken were Ray Vanderzaag and Perry Anderson.

(Photo by Judy Scott)

 

(Photo) Stayner Legion Midgets – O.B.A. Midget 'D' Champions 1978
STAYNER LEGION MIDGETS - O.B.A. MIDGET 'D' CHAMPIONS 1978

Joined the North Dufferin Baseball League the following year.
Back Row, L to R - Jack Warden (Legion Sports Officer), Steve Pilkey, Chris Fry, Tom Scott, Dean McDonald, John Nixon, Tim Newlove, Rick Perry, John Glenn, Paul Carruthers (Coach).
Front Row - Jim Henderson, Garry Forester, Glenn Carruthers, Mike Kinghan, Rick Walker, Scott Johnson, Tim Dickey. Absent: Gord Forester (Asst. Coach).

(Photo from Paul Carruthers)

 

(Photo) 1978 Clarksburg Blues
1978 CLARKSBURG BLUES

Front Row, L to R - Bill Gardner, Bill Lennox.
Middle Row - Gerald Eagles, Bob Ley, Garry Dillon, Bill Bowen, Wayne Fraser, Bill Bowen Sr. (Manager)
Back Row - Al Smith, Ron Lennox, Bill Lougheed, Bruce Whiteside, Bruce Manuel, Tom McCauley.
Missing - Brian McAteer, Bob Hutchinson, Vern Haines.

(Photo from Bob Hutchinson)

 

(Photo) Lisle Baseball team 1979
LISLE BASEBALL TEAM 1979

Front Row, L to R - Brian Nimigeon, John Johnson, David Sampson, Marc Johnson, Terry Shaw.
Back Row - Kenny Ward, Willie Crews, Tom Anderson, Rick Cook, Gord Dunn.
Missing - Bryan Lawson and Gord Martin.

(Photo) Paul Greer
PAUL GREER
One of Mansfield's top players on their two cup
winning teams in 1973 and 1976.

 

(Photo) Creemore Lions – Strother Cup Winners in 1978
CREEMORE LIONS - STROTHER CUP WINNERS IN 1978

Front Row, L to R - Llyod Micks, Brain MacIntosh, Rick Gowan, Mike Kinghan, Danny Gowan, Barry Corby, Ron MacDonald.
Rear Row - Mitch Coker, Bud Grieveson, Steve Hare, Rick Coker, Terry Gowan, John Wilson (Coach), Bruce Hare (Manager).

(Photo) New Lowell Knights
NEW LOWELL KNIGHTS

have had a most creditable record over recent years of the North Dufferin League, winning championships in 1977 and 1979 and posting first-place finishers over three seasons to total 94 wins, 4 ties and only 13 losses. This 1977 first championship team included, front, from left, Jim Halliday, Roger Mumberson, John Rainbird, Roy Walker, Ron Hubberd, Jimmy Prosser (bat boy), Boyd Breedon, Jerry Beelen; rear, Jim Prosser (Manager), Bill Patton, Elwin Lightheart, Wayne Rowe, Paul Walker, Wayne Lightheart and Marty Beelen.



The Future


New Lowell's championship in 1979 brought to the close another season and another decade of baseball 50 years after the first N.D.B.L. season. The league has emerged in good shape from this half century and appears ready to head into another successful 50 years.

The continuation of a rural league for this amount of time does not evolve easily and untroubled. There were times when the N.D.B.L. looked very shakey with as few as three teams competing in certain years. For the last 30 years, however, the league has developed strongly with a solid nucleus of established teams. Mansfield has never missed a season since they first entered in 1932 and Horning's Mills and Honeywood, although both dropping out at times, keep coming back with a great deal of interest. Clarksburg and Lisle were major additions to the league when they joined in the early 1960's as were New Lowell and Everett who joined later. Along with good young ball teams entering. Creemore, Ivy, Alliston, Elmgrove, Orangeville and Stayner have all joined in the 1970's to improve league play.

Interest is maintained every year with seasonal rivalries and a continuous change in league champions. Since Shelburne's dominance in the late 50s, the championship has been won twice in a row by only three teams. Clarksburg, Lisle, and Creemore hold this honour. After Creemore's victories in '68 and '69 there has never been a team winning consecutive titles. Although several teams have dominated league play the championship has been spread around with no less than six different winners in the last 10 years. It is a competitiveness all leagues would love to have.

In the last 10 years the N.D.B.L. has also been well represented in All-Ontario play. Creemore, New Lowell, Alliston, and Stayner teams have won OBA titles and their exceptional play has been a credit to the league.

At the present time another dimension is being added to the league. There are robust plans to form a North Dufferin Old-Timers team. The team, to be made up of former league players and elder players still performing in the league, plans to compete in tournaments, exhibition and benefit games throughout the area. It should prove to be most enjoyable and entertaining for the fans.

The Old-Timers team supports the evidence that interest in the game never seems to cease for both young and old. For this reason the future of the North Dufferin Baseball League looks bright indeed.




All-Star Games


One of the most exciting and best attended games of each and every season is the annual all-star game, first introduced to the league in 1963. The contest has proved to be a successful undertaking, not only for the fans and the entertainment it provides, but more importantly for the proceeds it raises that go into an injured players fund. This fund was set-up to give financial aid to any ball player injured while playing in the league. With the support of both players and fans over the years, the all-star game has turned out to be a very worthwhile affair.

Long before the annual event was first held, there was a baseball game which was probably the first ever all-star contest played in the North Dufferin League. It was a benefit game played in aid of a Horning's Mills' player, Earl Madill, who was hit by a pitched ball and suffered a fractured skull. The game was played in Mansfield before a large crowd on Labour Day, Sept. 5th, 1938. The teams participating were the "Wolves", the best players from Shelburne and Mansfield versus the "Bearcats", the best from Creemore and Horning's Mills. The true friendship and sportsmanship that the North Dufferin Baseball League has always stood for, clearly showed itself during this game with the "Bearcats" being made up of the same two teams that were battling head to head in the championship finals. It was in this series that Earl Madill had received his injury.

The game turned out to be a real hitters contest and when the nine inning-contest was over, the "Wolves" had defeated the "Bearcats" 18-14. The following are the players who were involved in this game.

Shelburne - Mansfield Wolves

Shelburne - Frank Paget, Sam McCauley, Earl Rayburn, Ralph Rands and Ken Woods. Mansfield - Alvin McDonald, Herb Jennings, El Greer, Harvey Sawyer, Reg Greer, Delmar Bates and Jim Cauthers.

Creemore - Horning's Mills Bearcats

Creemore - Bill Gowan, Norm Gowan, Roy Tipling, Charlie Sawyers, Ron Hodgson and Rupert Weir. Horning's Mills - Len Madill, Don Downey, Sandy Hunter, Bruce Hunter, Ross Johnston and Neil Madill.

The first annual all-star game in 1963 was arranged to have the previous year's championship team play the all-stars of the remaining teams. This set up the first game in Clarksburg, as the Giants had captured the Strother Cup in 1962. The contest featured strong hitting by both sides as is often the case in many all-star games. Clarksburg came out on top of an 11-8 score but it took an eight inning, three run rally to earn the victory. The All-Stars, behind 8-3 after only three innings of play, battled back to tie the score in their half of the eight inning before the Giants finally put the game away. Dennis Hutchinson, Hy Wells and Bob Winters led the winners with three hits each, with Vern Haines helping out with a home run and a triple. Bev Ruhl was the big hitter for the All-Stars with three safeties in four times at bat.

Following is the box score for the first annual all-star game in 1963.

Clarksburg AB R H
Gerry Binkley 4 3 2
Dennis Hutchinson 4 2 3
Harry Wells 5 1 3
Walter Goldsmith 4 0 0
Bob Winters 5 1 3
Pete Moreau 5 0 1
Howie Campbell 4 0 0
Laurie Gilbert 2 0 0
Bill Campbell 2 1 1
Ron Schwehr 0 0 0
Vern Haines 4 3 2
 
TOTAL 39 11 15
 
All-Stars AB R H
Bev Ruhl (Hon.) 4 2 3
John Guilfoyle (Lisle) 1 1 0
Jim Wallace (H.M.) 2 0 0
Dale Scott (Lisle) 4 0 1
Bob Doner (All) 2 0 0
Bob Collins (Shel) 1 0 1
Roy Weatherbee (All) 1 0 0
Laverne Corbett (Shel) 2 0 0
Ron Halliday (Shel) 2 0 0
Brian Nimigeon (Lisle) 3 1 0
Ross Archibald (H.M.) 0 1 0
Bill Schell (Lisle) 2 0 0
Bruce Atkinson (Hon) 3 1 1
Clark Grice (Shel) 1 0 1
Paul Mason (All) 2 1 1
Arnold Anderson (Hon) 1 0 1
Jim Lovegrove (Lisle) 1 0 0
Gary Smokum (All) 1 1 1
 
TOTAL 33 8 10



        R H E
ALL-STARS 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 8 10 6
CLARKSBURG 3 4 1 0 0 0 0 3 x 11 15 4


Players who were selected but did not play in the game included, Bill Jacklin from Horning's Mills, Bob Cunningham from Shelburne, Bud Anderson from Lisle, and Fred Gallaugher and Bill Knisley from Mansfield.

The format of having the previous year champs play the all-star was continued up to and including the 1972 season. The next year was the first season with the split league which set up an obvious challenge between the North Division and South Division for the all-star game. This idea was carried through and proved very beneficial. With the contest being held at a different park each year, it brought in more players, more fans and always exciting games with two divisions establishing a rivalry similar to the National and American teams in the Major League all-star game.

The first contest between the two divisions was held in Everett, who had won the league championship in 1972. It was an exciting game with the North Division edging out the South 5-4 after a last inning comeback attempt by the losers. The North side continually produced the stronger team and won the first five meetings in succession, before the South All-Stars finally won their first game in 1978. They repeated with another victory the following year, beating the North team 11-9.

In 1978 the league originated two new awards to be presented to the most valuable players of the all-star game, one from each team. The first year's awards went, quite fittingly, to two long-time players who had well represented the league during their careers and were perennial all-stars. Greg Greer of Mansfield was the South winner and Wayne Fraser of Clarksburg was the North winner.



M.V.P. Winners

 

1978 at Creemore
SOUTH - Greg Greer - Mansfield
NORTH - Wayne Fraser - Clarksburg

 

1979 at Ivy
SOUTH - Don Sabourin - Alliston
NORTH - Paul Walker - New Lowell


The league added a further dimension to their all-star play in 1979. They agreed to play the neighbouring South Simcoe League in a "Challenge Cup" game, once a year, with the winner receiving a trophy sponsored by Garner's Sports of Barrie. The first challenge game was played in Alliston, on July 22, and won by the South Simcoe All-Stars 11-5. It was a close game for seven innings with the score tied 4-4, before the South Simcoe batters broke loose in the eight to put the game out of reach.

The contest was a huge success in more ways than one. Along with the further revenue that both leagues gained for their respective injured player funds, it also tightened the relationship between the two leagues which can only prove to be beneficial in the years to follow.

 
ALL-STAR GAMES
Year Team   Team   Location
1963 Clarksburg 11 All-Stars 8 Clarksburg
1964 All-Stars 3 Clarksburg 2 Clarksburg
1965* All-Stars - Mansfield - Mansfield
1966 All-Stars 7 Clarksburg 6 Clarksburg
1967 All-Stars 7 Lisle 5 Lisle
1968 All-Stars 7 Lisle 6 Lisle
1969 Creemore 8 All-Stars 5 Creemore
1970 All-Stars 9 Creemore 3 Creemore
1971 Everett 5 All-Stars 2 Everett
1972 All-Stars 16 Lisle 1 Lisle
1973 North 5 South 4 Everett
1974 North 3 South 1 New Lowell
1975 North 5 South 1 Mansfield
1976 North 17 South 11 Clarksburg
1977 North 15 South 9 Shelburne
1978 South 7 North 2 Creemore
1979 South 11 North 9 Ivy

* All-Stars won - score unknown



All-Star Selections

 

 
1964
at Clarksburg


EVERETT
Bob Brandon
HONEYWOOD
Arnold Anderson
Bev Ruhl
LISLE
Bud Anderson
John Guilfoyle
Claude Lawson
Jim Lovegrove
Brian Nimigeon
Bill Schell
Dale Scott
MANSFIELD
Roy Weatherbee
SHELBURNE
Ken Silk
Bob Collins
Laverne Corbett
Doug Howard
1965
at Mansfield

CLARKSBURG
Gerry Binkly
Vern Haines
Gord McAteer
John McMurchy
Bill Milne
Peter Moreau
ALLISTON
John Morrison
Gary Craig
Doug Rodriguiz
Ray Thiebert
HONEYWOOD
Arnold Anderson
Al Harris
Bev Ruhl
HORNING'S MILLS
Brian Bates
LISLE
Jim Lovegrove
Ed McCarthy
Brian Nimigeon
Dale Scott
1966 at Clarksburg
ANGUS
Ed Weymouth
CREEMORE
Don Gillis
Randy MacMullan
HONEYWOOD
Wayne Fraser
Glenn Laverty
LISLE
John Guilfoyle
Jim Lovegrove
Brian Nimigeon
Dale Scott
MANSFIELD
Barry Greer
Phil McDonald

 
1967
at Lisle

ALLISTON
Gary Craig
Orville Jenkins
John Morrison
ANGUS
     Eros
CLARKSBURG
Larry Bowhey
Vern Haines
Gord McAteer
Bill Milne
Peter Moreau
CREEMORE
Bruce Gowan
Randy MacMullan
HONEYWOOD
Wayne Fawcett
Jack McClelland
Bev Ruhl
MANSFIELD
Barry Greer
Phil MacDonald
Al Murphy
Roy Weatherbee
NEW LOWELL
Gary Parrish
Wayne Rowe
1968 ALL-STARS
at Lisle - Stars 7 Lisle 6

CLARKSBURG
Gord McAteer
Vern Haines
Al Smith
Ron Lennox
CREEMORE
Randy MacMullan
Bruce Gowan
Brian Newell
Don Gillis
Paul Walker
HONEYWOOD
Bruce Wilson
Jack McClelland
Wayne Fawcett
Gord Tupling
MANSFIELD
Barry Greer
Roy Weatherbee
Phil MacDonald
Greg Greer
Al Josey
NEW LOWELL
Ralph Lightheart
Merv Dickey
Bill Patton
Garry Parrish
ALLISTON
Grant Jenkins
John Morrison
SHELBURNE
Bob Cunningham
Dennis Ritchie
1969 at Creemore
ALLISTON
Greg Campbell
Dan Doner
John Morrison
ANGUS
Jim Baker
Bob Boxall
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Vern Haines
Al Smith
HONEYWOOD
Wayne Fawcett
Bev Ruhl
LISLE
Roger Anderson
John Johnson Sr.
Bob Nimigeon
Brian Nimigeon
Dale Scott
MANSFIELD
Barry Greer
Greg Greer
Phil McDonald
Roy Weatherbee
NEW LOWELL
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe
SHELBURNE
Wayne Merkley
Dennis Merkley

 
1970
at Creemore

CHESLEY
H. Webber
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Dennis Boyle
Bob Hutchinson
Al Smith
LISLE
Doug Anderson
Roger Anderson
Wayne Fraser
John Johnson Sr.
Jim Lovegrove
Brian Nimigeon
MANSFIELD
Paul Greer
NEW LOWELL
Elwin Lightheart
Rick McCarthy
Gary Parrish
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe
OWEN SOUND
Garth Waines
SHELBURNE
Wayne Fawcett
Bert Wilson
1971
at Everett

HONEYWOOD
Keith Henry
Brian Noble
LISLE
Doug Anderson
Wayne Fraser
Jim Lovegrove
Brian Nimigeon
Dale Scott
MANSFIELD
Greg Greer
Paul Greer
Phil McDonald
Terry Shacklady
NEW LOWELL
Elwin Lightheart
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe
1972
at Lisle

CLARKSBURG
Al Smith
CREEMORE
Gary Armagost
Barry Corby
Rick Gowan
EVERETT
Les Gerrard
Grant Jenkins
Orville Jenkins
HONEYWOOD
Keith Henry
MANSFIELD
Greg Greer
Paul Greer
Jim Lovegrove
Phil McDonald
Dale Scott
NEW LOWELL
Elwin Lightheart
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe

 
1973
at Everett

North
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Bob Hutchinson
Brian McAteer
Bob McGugan
CREEMORE
John Johnson Sr.
Russ Meek
John Westbrooke
HONEYWOOD
Glenn Laverty
Jack McClelland
Bev Ruhl
LISLE
Doug Anderson
Tom Anderson
Gary Bustarache
Rick Buchanan
Evan Jamieson
Brian Nimigeon
NEW LOWELL
Willie Beelen
Elwin Lightheart
Wayne Lightheart
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe


South
ALLISTON
Bill Edgar
Scott Morrison
Dave Mortimer
EVERETT
Grant Jenkins
Orville Jenkins
Jim Ovens
MANSFIELD
Paul Greer
Dave Little
Roger Maes
Phil McDonald
Dale Scott
Jim Shacklady
Terry Shacklady
SHELBURNE
Wayne Fawcett
Don McGhee
THORNTON
Earl Elliott
John Marshall
John Walton
1974
at New Lowell

North
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Ron Lennox
Al Smith
Bruce Whiteside
CREEMORE
Victor Dodd
Russ Meek
HONEYWOOD
Glenn Laverty
Jack McClelland
Bev Ruhl
LISLE
Doug Anderson
Tom Anderson
Barry Corby
Wayne Fraser
Rick Gowan
Jim Lovegrove
Brian Nimigeon
NEW LOWELL
Ron Ellis
Elwin Lightheart
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe


South
ALLISTON
Jim Doner
Doug Dundas
Kevin Greer
Larry Halbert
EVERETT
Steve Cunningham
Willie Gauley
Orville Jenkins
IVY
Al Elliott
Earl Elliott
Ed Patton
Henry Sander
Dave Schandlen
MANSFIELD
Greg Greer
Paul Greer
Dave Little
Roger Maes
Phil McDonald
Dale Scott
Jim Shacklady
Terry Shacklady
SHELBURNE
Gord Connor
Doug Greer

 
1975
at Mansfield

North
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Bob Hutchinson
Ron Lennox
Al Smith
Bruce Whiteside
CREEMORE
John Johnson Sr.
Brian MacIntosh
HONEYWOOD
Glenn Laverty
Jack McClelland
Bev Ruhl
Bert Wilson
LISLE
Doug Anderson
Roger Anderson
Tom Anderson
Wayne Fraser
Rick Gowan
Jim Lovegrove
Brian Nimigeon
NEW LOWELL
Jim Halliday
Elwin Lightheart
Bill Patton
Wayne Rowe


South
ALLISTON
John Glass
Tom Faulkner
Dave Purchase
EVERETT
Steve Cunningham
Grant Jenkins
Orville Jenkins
Lorne Milbury
IVY
Al Elliott
Earl Elliott
Ed Patton
Brian Reid
Henry Sander
Dave Schandlen
MANSFIELD
Greg Greer
Paul Greer
Dave Little
Roger Maes
Dale Scott
Jim Shacklady
Terry Shacklady
SHELBURNE
Doug Greer
Dan Shacklady
1976
at Clarksburg

North
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Wayne Fraser
Ron Lennox
Bob Ley
Bill Lougheed
HONEYWOOD
Jack McClelland
Bev Ruhl
Bert Wilson
HORNING'S MILLS
Gord Connor
Wayne Fawcett
Wayne Flear
LISLE
Doug Anderson
Tom Anderson
Gary Bastarache
Rick Buchanan
Rick Gowan
NEW LOWELL
Elwin Lightheart
Roger Mumberson
Bill Patton
John Rainbird
Wayne Rowe


South
ALLISTON
Don Bruce
Jim Doner
Ray McCague
ELMGROVE
Richard Kerr
EVERETT
Steve Cunningham
Grant Jenkins
IVY
Al Elliott
Earl Elliott
Ed Patton
Henry Sander
John Walton
MANSFIELD
Greg Greer
Dave Little
Al Murphy
Roger Maes
Dave Purchase
Dan Shacklady
Jim Shacklady
Terry Shacklady
SHELBURNE
Brent Pendleton

 
1977
at Shelburne

North
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Ron Lennox
Bruce Manuel
Brian McAteer
Bob Hutchinson
Bruce Whiteside
HONEYWOOD
Ed Downey
Barry Looby
Dale Looby
Jack McClelland
Bev Ruhl
Bert Wilson
HORNING'S MILLS
Keith Henry
Doug Pullen
LISLE
Tom Anderson
Rick Gowan
John Johnson Jr.
Barry Lane
Frank Wadas
Ken Ward


South
ALLISTON
Perry Anderson
Roger Rutledge
Dale Storey
ELMGROVE
Mike Crawford
Richard Kerr
EVERETT
Steve Cunningham
Willie Gauley
Orville Jenkins
Jim Ovens
IVY
Al Elliott
Ed Patton
Henry Sander
Dave Schandlen
MANSFIELD
Greg Greer
Jim Greer
SHELBURNE
Dave Little
Roger Maes

 
1978
at Creemore

North
CLARKSBURG
Wayne Fraser
Bob Lee
CREEMORE
Rick Coker
Rick Gowan
Terry Gowan
HONEYWOOD
Jack McClelland
Bert Wilson
HORNING'S MILLS
Wayne Fraser
Jim Gollinger
Keith Henry
Bob McLaren
LISLE
Perry Anderson
Tom Anderson
Les Culley
Gord Dunn
Brian Lawson
Frank Wadas
NEW LOWELL
Marty Beelen
Jim Halliday
Wayne Lightheart
Roger Mumberson
Paul Walker
Wayne Rowe


South
ALLISTON
Brent Bailey
Chris Darling
Barry McCague
Don Sabourin
Darryl Thompson
ELMGROVE
Mike Crawford
EVERETT
Steve Cunningham
Willie Gauley
Orville Jenkins
IVY
Al Elliott
Wayne Gethons
Ed Patton
Henry Sander
Dave Schandlen
MANSFIELD
Greg Campbell
Greg Greer
Richard Kerr
Jim Shacklady
ORANGEVILLE
Steve Soloman

1979 All-Star

SOUTH DIVISION
ALLISTON
Don Sabourin
Terry Horan
Barry McCague
Perry Anderson
ELMGROVE
Dennis Whiteside
Doug Dundas
EVERETT
Willy Gauley
Steve Cunningham
Grant Jenkins
Chris Darling
IVY
Dave Schandlen
Henry Sander
Dave Speers
MANSFIELD
Doug Greer
Kevin Greer
Alva Pendleton
ORANGEVILLE
Mike Dana

Teams

NORTH DIVISION
CLARKSBURG
Bill Bowen
Bill Lennox
CREEMORE
Rick Gowan
Brian MacIntosh
Barry Corby
Terry Gowan
HONEYWOOD
Barry Looby
Tom Broderick
HORNING'S MILLS
Wayne Flear
Steve Woods
LISLE
Tom Anderson
Ken Ward
NEW LOWELL
Roger Mumberson
Paul Walker
Roy Walker
Jim Halliday
STAYNER
Tim Newlove
Rick Walker
Tom Scott
Glen McDonald


 
 
NORTH DUFFERIN BASEBALL LEAGUE
ALL-STARS
"CHALLENGE CUP GAME 1979"


  ALLISTON
Terry Horan
Barry McCague
Don Sabourin
CLARKSBURG
Bob Lee
Ron Lennox
Al Smith
CREEMORE
Rick Gowan
Terry Gowan
Mike Kinghan
EVERETT
Steve Cunningham
Chris Darling
Willie Gauley
ELMGROVE
Doug Dundas
HORNINGS'S MILLS
Steve Woods
IVY
Henry Sander
Dave Schandlen
Dave Speers
LISLE
Tom Anderson
MANSFIELD
Richard Kerr
NEW LOWELL
Jim Halliday
Roger Mumberson
Paul Walker
Roy Walker
ORANGEVILLE
Steve Soloman
STAYNER
Tom Scott
Rick Zeggil
Tim Newlove





A Tribute to the Umpires


A major part of any baseball league are the officials. It is a job that is often thankless and unappreciated by both players and fans alike. Filling these positions each year can be a difficult undertaking for a league that has over 150 games in the regular season alone. It was one area that the newly-formed North Dufferin League in 1930 had little concern with. Their solution was to pick one umpire from each of the participating teams and to have two of these men at each game. However, one must consider there were only 12 games in the entire league and only one game played on any day, a schedule that four men could easily handle. This system was again repeated in 1931 with John Grainger, Joe Grainger, Jim Stinson and Roy Coleman umpiring the 12-game schedule.

Over the years the league has been fortunate to have many dedicated and hard-working men to officiate. One of the most popular umpires was Al Crawford who did many games during the 40's and 50's. Lloyd Patton, Maurice Miller and Ed White are three more people who spent many years as umpires in the league. The one umpire who probably served the league better than anyone else was Bill Gowan.

He came into the league in 1937 as a player and participated in many ways for 40 years, up to his death in 1976.

Bill joined the league for the first time when Creemore entered a team in 1937. He was a standout ballplayer, playing third base, pitching and catching and continually led the team in batting with an average usually over .400 every year. Bill then turned from player to manager of the Creemore team in the early 1950's and at the same time started umpiring in the league. In later years he took over as umpire-in-chief and did an excellent job in this capacity. He was also the principle individual in starting and organizing the Annual Awards Night, an event that has been a tremendous success for the league.

Bill Gowan and the league's other umpires, both past and present, have received little credit for their hard work over the years. However, such credit was given by one N.D.B.L. player, Everett's Mike Boughton, in a letter to the Creemore Star in 1970. It is fitting for all umpires who have officiated in the league, not only to the few that are mentioned. Part of the letter is as follows:

...could you possibly print a paragraph or so thanking Mr. (Bill) Gowan and his staff for the outstanding job they did in umpiring our ball games in the North Dufferin League.

For without the time and knowledge of the game that these men put into it, we undoubtedly would not have a league at all.

They have to put up with a lot of harrassment from all the teams and the fans, but this does not take away from the judgment they have on close calls as well as routine ones.

I myself give them a rough time but still without them I know there would be no ball. So may I take this time and sincerely thank Mr. Gowan, Mr. (Maurice) Miller, Mr. (Lloyd) Patton, and Mr. (Ed) White for a JOB WELL DONE, gentlemen.





North Dufferin Baseball League
Challenge Cup


In 1931, L. C. A. Strother donated a silver cup to the North Dufferin Baseball League. The cup, as he outlined, would be a perpetual gift to be held by the winning team for one year upon which their team name would be engraved. It has been awarded on this basis a total of 44 times up to and including the 1979 season. Eleven different teams have had their name inscribed on the Strother Cup. Mansfield has won it more than any other team; a total of nine times in their 43 year history. They are closely followed by Shelburne with eight championships in 38 seasons of play.

The cup has provided many cherished and memorable times for the winners and occasionally for the losers as well. In 1971 the Clarksburg team, after losing the finals to Lisle, stole the cup from the winner's victory party and boasted as to having won the championship to gain drinks from a local bar.

It was again temporarily abducted a few years later, this time from the league's Awards Night, by two Mansfield players. Ever since it has been carefully watched when displayed in public.

The cup has remained unchanged since it's initial year although the

(Photo) North Dufferin Baseball League Challenge Cup


wood base was refinished in 1974 by Brian Nimigeon. However this base will need to be enlarged in the near future to accommodate the annual name plaques of the champions.

This award was won in the first year by Honeywood, by virtue of a first place finish in regular season play. Playoffs to determine a champion were not held until 1933 when Mansfield defeated Horning's Mills in a best of three final. The playoffs remained as a two out of three affair until after the Second World War. It is interesting to note that all third and final games in a series during this time were usually played at a neutral ball park.

The playoffs were lengthened to a best of five series in 1945 and a best of seven series was first played in 1952. The victorious Creemore team required the full seven games in defeating Horning's Mills that year. The championship series is now held every year as a best of seven affair with the winning team requiring four wins or a total of eight points, gaining two points for a win and one for a tie.



N.D.B.L. Cup Winners

 

 
 
Year Team
1931 Honeywood
1932 Mansfield
1933 Mansfield
1934 Mansfield
1935 Horning's Mills
1936 Unknown
1937 Horning's Mills
1938 Creemore
1939 Ivy
1940-44 No League
1945 Mansfield
1946 Unknown
1947 Mansfield
Year Team
1948 Shelburne
1949 Mansfield
1950 Shelburne
1951 Horning's Mills
1952 Creemore
1953 Shelburne
1954 Shelburne
1955 Alliston
1956 Alliston
1957 Shelburne
1958 Shelburne
1959 Shelburne
1960 Shelburne

 

    Champions Finalists Games
  1961 Lisle Everett 4-3
  1962 Clarksburg Horning's Mills 4-2 1 tie
  1963 Clarksburg Lisle 4-3
  1964 Mansfield Honeywood 4-1
  1965 Clarksburg Lisle 4-3 1 tie
  1966 Lisle Clarksburg 4-0
  1967 Lisle Clarksburg 4-0
  1968 Creemore Lisle 3-1 2 ties
  1969 Creemore New Lowell 4-3
  1970 Everett Chesley 4-2
  1971 Lisle Clarksburg 4-1
  1972 Everett Clarksburg 4-1
  1973 Mansfield Lisle 4-1
  1974 Lisle New Lowell 4-3 1 tie
  1975 Ivy Mansfield 4-3
  1976 Mansfield Ivy 3-1 2 ties
  1977 New Lowell Ivy 4-0
  1978 Creemore New Lowell 4-2
  1979 New Lowell Alliston 4-0






NORTH DUFFERIN BASEBALL LEAGUE TROPHY


The North Dufferin Baseball League Trophy was donated in 1963 by the league, to be awarded annually to the first place finisher in regular season play. It served for the entire league up to and including the 1972 season. When the league was divided into two divisions in 1973, this trophy was awarded to the winners of the South Division.

(Photo) North Dufferin Baseball League Trophy - First Place South Division

 

WINNERS
 
   
1963 Lisle
1964 Clarksburg
1965 Lisle
1966 Lisle
1967 Lisle
1968 Lisle
1969 Creemore
1970 Clarksburg
1971 Lisle
1972 Mansfield
   
South Division
1973 Mansfield
1974 Mansfield
1975 Ivy
1976 Ivy
1977 Ivy
1978 Allsiton
1979 Alliston




ROSS HOUSTON MEMORIAL TROPHY


Awarded to the North Division first place finisher of the N.D.B.L., this trophy was donated by the Lisle Baseball Club in memory of Ross Houston, one of the community's best known citizens. A resident of Lisle for 17 years, Mr. Houston was always a keen supporter of local sporting activities and took an active part in the Lisle team as manager in the 1960's. He died of a heart attack in 1972 shortly after umpiring a baseball game at the Lisle park.

(Photo) Ross Houston Memorial Trophy - First Place North

 

WINNERS
   
1973 Lisle
1974 Lisle
1975 New Lowell
1976 New Lowell
1977 New Lowell
1978 New Lowell
1979 New Lowell




G. BRUCE JENKINS MEMORIAL TROPHY


Presented by the Everett Ball Club, this trophy is awarded annually to the Most Valuable Player in the North Dufferin Baseball League. It was donated in memory of one of the nicest and well-liked players to play in the league. Bruce was raised in Everett and played minor ball for his home town. He played his North Dufferin baseball mostly in Everett, with one year in Lisle and was on three championship teams. Bruce was killed in a traffic accident in 1974 at the age of 25.

(Photo) Bruce Jenkins Memorial Trophy - Most Valuable Player

 

WINNERS
     
1974 Dave Little Mansfield
1975 Doug Anderson Lisle
1976 Dave Little Mansfield
1977 Jim Halliday New Lowell
1978 Don Sabourin Alliston
1979 Don Sabourin Alliston




BATTING CHAMPIONSHIP


This is the oldest individual award that the league presents annually and goes to the player with the highest batting average. It was introduced in 1971 when league batting records were kept by a statistician for the first time. Although it is the oldest award there has yet to be an annual return trophy donated for this category. However, the winners are presented with a trophy each year to keep permanently.

WINNERS
     
1971 Wayne Rowe New Lowell
1972 Doug Anderson Lisle
1973 Barry Corby Lisle
1974 Glenn Laverty Honeywood
1975 Wayne Rowe New Lowell
1976 Dave Little Mansfield
1977 Paul Walker New Lowell
1978 Barry Corby Creemore
1979 Rick Gowan Creemore




N.D.B.L. TOP 10 BATTERS

 

 
       
1971

  AB H Ave.
Wayne Rowe (NL) 67 31 .463
Jack McClelland (H) 58 26 .448
Orville Jenkins (E) 83 35 .422
Phil McDonald (M) 70 27 .386
Grant Jenkins (E) 81 30 .370
Fred David (L) 73 27 .369
Bob McGugan (C) 56 20 .357
Paul Duffin (S) 65 23 .354
Wayne Fraser (L) 102 36 .353
Doug Greer (M) 81 28 .346
       
1974

  AB H Ave.
Glenn Laverty (H) 68 32 .470
Earl Elliott (Ivy) 74 32 .432
Wayne Rowe (NL) 78 33 .423
Paul Greer (M) 66 27 .409
Bill Patton (NL) 77 31 .402
Bruce Whiteside (Cl) 62 24 .387
Ron Lennox (Cl) 70 27 .386
Orville Jenkins (E) 63 24 .381
Elwin Lightheart (NL) 88 33 .375
Wayne Fraser (L) 75 28 .373

 

 
       
1976

  AB H Ave.
Dave Little (M) 70 36 .514
Roger Mumberson (NL) 70 33 .471
Jim Ovens (E) 51 24 .471
John Rainbird (NL) 66 29 .439
Bill Patton (NL) 53 22 .415
Jack McClelland (H) 58 24 .414
Henry Sanders (Ivy) 78 32 .410
Al Elliott (Ivy) 66 27 .409
John Whiteside (Elm) 59 24 .407
Ray McCague (A)) 57 23 .404
       
1977

  AB H Ave.
Paul Walker (NL) 76 40 .526
Jim Ovens (E) 79 34 .430
Roger Rutledge (A) 68 295 .426
Roger Mumberson (NL) 98 41 .418
Jack McClelland (H) 82 33 .402
Grant Jenkins (E)) 85 33 .388
Steve Cunningham (E) 76 29 .381
Barry McCague (A) 66 25 .379
John Rainbird (NL) 70 26 .371
Henry Sander (Ivy) 92 34 .370

 

 
       
1978

  AB H Ave.
Barry Corby 65 38 .585
Rick Gowan (C)     .475
Jack McClelland (H)     .470
Tom Anderson (L)     .443
Bill Demaniuk (A)     .433
Roger Mumberson (NL)     .418
Bob Henry Sander (Ivy)     .416
Keith Henry (HM)     .415
Brent Bailey (A)     .410
Terry Gowan (C)     .409
       
1979

  AB H Ave.
Rick Gowan (C) 66 38 .576
Dave Speers (Ivy) 73 35 .479
Barry Corby (C) 45 21 .467
Roger Mumberson (NL) 73 33 .452
Marty Beelen (NL) 62 28 .452
Orville Jenkins (E) 62 26 .419
Tom Broderick (H) 60 24 .400
Bev Ruhl (H) 43 17 .395
Steve Cunningham (E) 71 28 .394
Jim Halliday (NL) 44 17 .386

 

(A) Alliston, (C) Creemore, (Cl) Clarksburg, (E) Everett,
(Elm) Elmgrove, (H) Honeywood, (HM) Horning's Mills, (Ivy) Ivy,
(L) Lisle, (M) Mansfield, (NL) New Lowell, (S) Shelburne




PAST PRESIDENT'S TROPHY


The newest award in the league is a trophy presented annually to the N.D.B.L. player who best combines ability and sportsmanship. It is an important award, as it stands for the principles that have helped make the league a success in its many years. The idea for this trophy came from a long time player, coach and executive, Adrian Maes, who was serving as league Past President at the time. The award was therefore justly named the Past President's Trophy.

(Photo) Past President's Trophy - Most Sportsmanlike Player

 

WINNERS
     
1979 Tom Anderson Lisle




LLOYD PATTON / BILL GOWAN MEMORIAL TROPHY


Donated by the Patton and Gowan families in 1977, this trophy is in memory of two men, who as umpires in the league, both served for over 25 years. Although never a player, Lloyd Patton contributed a great deal of his time each season in officiating many games for the league. Bill Gowan was involved in almost every way possible. As a player, coach and umpire, he did as much for the league as anyone in it's long history. This trophy is presented each year to the top pitcher in the North Dufferin Baseball League.

(Photo) Lloyd Patton / Bill Gowan Memorial Trophy - Best Pitcher

 

WINNERS
     
1977 Jim Halliday New Lowell
  Wayne Lightheart New Lowell
1978 Wayne Lightheart New Lowell
1979 Jim Halliday New Lowell





In Closing


The popularity of the North Dufferin Baseball League has grown immensely over the years. Much more than just a competitive baseball league, it is an organization where players can associate with other players on other teams, not only as rivals during league games but as teammates in all-star and benefit games. They meet also as friends during off-field activities that often occur with tournaments and special events in the baseball season.

The most significant of these special events is the league's Annual Awards Night. Thanks to the efforts of Bill Gowan, Bud Anderson, Adrian Maes, Bill Patton and Wayne Rowe, who were among the chief organizers starting this event in 1974, the dance and awards night has become an enjoyable affair to wind up each ball season. Along with the primary reason of presenting the annual trophies, it also provided great support to the league both financially and socially.

The success of the league can be attributed to the fact that over the years there have been so many players and organizers interested and willing to work hard in order to keep baseball thriving.

With the popularity of baseball in the area still strong, it is most conceivable the North Dufferin Baseball League will keep growing and improving in future years. There is a certain 'something' that has made this game great and will continue to make it great.

When a long-time Mansfield player, Reg Greer, was asked the reason for walking two and three miles to a game or practice and the reason for sitting on the bench for years, awaiting an opportunity to play, he best summed the feeling of most every player by saying:

"It was for 'the love of baseball'!"

(Photo) Presentation of Best Pitcher trophy to Jim Halliday


Jim Halliday of New Lowell Knights receiving "Best Pitcher" trophy (Gowan/Patton Memorial Trophy) from Bob Patton and Carl Gowan.

N.D.B.L. Awards Dance August, 1979.


(Photo) Presentation of 1st Place Trophy for North Division to New Lowell's Bob Patton

Terry Gowan presenting "1st Place Trophy for North Division" to Bob Patton of New Lowell Knights. North Dufferin Baseball League Awards Dance - August, 1979.


(Photo) President Jim Shacklady





Jim Shacklady President guarding N.D.B.L. Championship Cup

N.D.B.L. Awards Dance August, 1979.





- Financial Assistance -


There has been a great deal of financial assistance offered to make possible this 50-year history of the North Dufferin Baseball League which must necessarily be largely financed through sales of the book. These are currently limited to 500 copies and the League officers trust the response will be adequate to underwrite the printing cost. In the meantime, we acknowledge the financial assistance of the following whose interest and support have encouraged the launching of this undertaking.

********


ALLISTON ALUMINUM, ALLISTON
SOUND ELITE D-J SERVICE, LISLE
DONER BROS. INSURANCE, ALLISTON
DUFFERIN PACKERS LTD., HONEYWOOD
JACK STAVELY CRAFTED STOVES, NEW LOWELL
THE CREEMORE STAR, CREEMORE
ALLISTON SMOKE SHOP, ALLISTON
JAMES FRASER & SON, PLUMBING, HORNING'S MILLS
ALLISTON LEAFS BASEBALL CLUB
CREEMORE BARONS BASEBALL CLUB
CLARKSBURG BLUES BASEBALL CLUB
EVERETT BASEBALL CLUB
ELMGROVE BASEBALL CLUB
HONEYWOOD BASEBALL CLUB
HORNING'S MILLS BASEBALL CLUB
IVY RANGERS BASEBALL CLUB
LISLE ASTROS BASEBALL CLUB
MANSFIELD CUBS BASEBALL CLUB
NEW LOWELL KNIGHTS BASEBALL CLUB
ORANGEVILLE BASEBALL CLUB
STAYNER BASEBALL CLUB




(Photo) Adrian Maes
ADRIAN MAES

Shown here as Coach of 1976 Champion Mansfield Cubs. He was instrumental in starting the North Dufferin Baseball League History Review when serving as the league's Past President in 1978.